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Cumming exhibit pairs needlework, technology

CummingExhibitDunphy.jpg
When scanned with a smartphone or tablet, each of Didi Dunphy's embroidered QR codes links to a web-based video, also created by the artist.

An exhibit that combines the traditional art of cross-stich embroidery with the technologies of mobile computing and video opens Jan. 15 in the library on the University of North Georgia's Cumming Campus.

"Didi Dunphy's 'Sampler' exhibit is a wonderful fit for the Cumming Campus," said Beth Sale, director of UNG's galleries. "The physical object on display, the embroidery, is relatively small compared to the impact of the concept and the online video accessed through the tangible object. The association of the two dissimilar art forms establishes a complex context for the viewer."

When scanned with a smartphone or tablet, each of Dunphy's embroidered QR codes links to a web-based video, also created by the artist.

"This new work interfaces my explorations of performance and participation, feminine design or 'women’s work' and video intersecting with the new smart technologies … this embroidery technique is the same as school-girl samplers by the early female Pioneer settlers," Dunphy said. "The subject matter investigates or revolves around play activity as social performance. My video work is designed for hand-held devices in a landscape format, and each video pushes hue and saturation and has duration suitable for the venue of a mobile phone."

The exhibit is on display through Feb. 28. Dunphy will give an artist talk on Feb. 6 at 11 a.m. A reception follows at noon.

Dunphy, a native of New York, lives in Athens, Ga., and has a Master of Fine Arts degree in contemporary arts from San Francisco Art Institute. She formerly taught in the University of Georgia's Lamar Dodd School of Art, and has curated many exhibits in the Athens area. Dunphy has exhibited in major venues such as the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, Center for Creative Arts in St. Louis, Telfair Museum in Savannah, the Jacksonville Museum of Modern Art in Florida, and the Armory Center for the Arts in Pasadena, Calif.

Dunphy and her work have been featured in Southern Living, Athens Magazine, Craft, the Los Angeles Times, San Francisco Chronicle, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, Elle Décor, Interior Design, Vogue Living, and two design books.

Several other exhibits continue at UNG's galleries this month, including work from artists Ed Gilliam and Jeffrey Whittle and collaborations between artists and poets.

On Jan. 15, Gilliam will give an artist's talk at 1:15 p.m. on the Gainesville Campus in conjunction with "Ed Gilliam: Works from the Thomas E. Scanlin Collection," which features ceramic discs hand-built by Gilliam and covered with compelling images of intertwined creatures and human figures. The talk at the Roy C. Moore Art Gallery is free and open to the public; the exhibit continues through Feb. 6.

"No Small Measure: Collaborations between Artists & Poets," which features 15 broadsides and is funded by a grant from the Forsyth County Arts Alliance, is on display in the Bob Owens Art Gallery on the Dahlonega Campus through Jan. 28. A reception and poetry readings begin at 5 p.m. Jan. 16 in the gallery; the event is free and open to the public.

Paintings by Whittle, recently named one of the "New Superstars of Southern Art" by Oxford American Magazine, will be on display in the Oconee Campus Gallery through Feb. 12. Whittle, who earned his Master of Fine Arts degree in painting from Cornell University, will speak about his work on Feb. 4 at 2:15 p.m.

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