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Master of Science in Criminal Justice

The Master of Science with a Major in Criminal Justice program at the University of North Georgia (UNG) is designed for practitioners already in the field or in military service and others that are seeking to improve their credentials and knowledge base for professional advancement.

The focus of the program is on international crime and justice. Additionally, the program helps develop an understanding of theory, policy, and administration in criminal justice.

The Master of Science in Criminal Justice (MSCJ) is a 36-semester-hour graduate program at UNG.  All program instruction is delivered on-line.  Students may apply for admission and begin studies in the program during fall, spring or summer semesters.

If you still have questions after reviewing our site, please contact us with your questions.

Campus Availability

Online Only

Contact Information

Program Coordinator

Timothy Hayes
timothy.hayes@ung.edu
706-867-2142

Course Information

Requirements and Courses

MSCJ Degree Requirements

  • Graduation requirements for the Master of Science with a major in Criminal Justice include:
  • Completion of 36 semester hours (15 semester hours of core courses, 18 semester hours of electives, and three semester hours of a capstone course).
  • Cumulative grade point average of 3.0.
  • Completion of at least 30 semester hours of graduate degree requirements in residence, with no more than six semester hours of transfer credit.
  • Completion of all degree-related course requirements, including transfer credit, within a six-year period.
  • Good standing in the Master of Science with a major in Criminal Justice program.

Plan of Study: 36 Semester Hours

Core Required Courses: 15 Semester Hours

CRJU 7001 - Criminal Justice Theory

This course provides an analysis and investigation of criminological theory with an emphasis on understanding theoretical principles in application in criminal justice policy, treatment, and practice. Pre-requisite: An undergraduate course in criminology or social theory

Hours:
3

View Course in Catalog

CRJU 7002 - Research Methodology-Crim Just

This course consists of an examination of research methods, including research paradigms and methodologies across criminal justice, research question formulation, research project design, and research ethics.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 7003 - Statistical Analysis Crim Just

This course provides a foundation for the use of statistical methods in criminal justice research. It will review fundamentals of research, showing the interplay between the theory, the research, the statistical method, and the interpretation of analytical and statistical concepts and procedures relevant to crime and criminal justice policy data. Contemporary race, gender, and other diversity issues, and their relevance to criminal offenders, crime victims, and the criminal justice system, are explored using statistical techniques on live data from a variety of criminal justice data banks.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 7005 - Global Crime and Justice

In the last two decades, transnational crime has experienced an unprecedented expansion, now accounting for roughly 15 percent of the world's GDP. Profits from transnational crime groups have been termed the 'global shadow economy' or the 'dark side of the economy.' The purpose of this course is to study crime and criminal justice from a global perspective. The course will examine how globalization and improvements in communication technologies have led to a recent growth in transnational crime. The course will explore issues surrounding the definitions, incidence, and trends in transnational crime. The course also analyzes efforts made by contemporary nation states and multilateral agencies to combat illicit transnational activity. Specific crime topics discussed include, drug trafficking, arms trafficking, the trafficking of persons, the sex industry, fraud, cybercrime, and transnational criminal organizations.

Hours:
3

View Course in Catalog

CRJU 7010 - Criminal Justice Policy

This course is a survey of program evaluation and policy analysis techniques relating to the philosophical and practical administration of criminal justice. The focus is on how policy in criminal justice is created, analyzed and changed. The student will be introduced to critical issues in criminal justice and policymaking at the local, state, and federal levels as well as effective and ineffective policies and strategies used in the criminal justice system.

Hours:
3

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Electives (Choose 6 of the 10 Courses): 18 Semester Hours

CRJU 7112 - Police and Society

The purpose of this course is to examine the development and role of police in modern society. This not a course on police administration or criminal investigation, rather the course examines the function of police in the context of the large society. As such, it will explore such topics as, the history of policing, police recruitment, police misconduct, police discretion, police culture, patterns of police-community relations, crime prevention strategies, the relationship between police and the media. Like other course in the graduate curriculum, this class will integrate theory, research, and policy by relying on academic journal articles as the source for class discussions.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 7117 - Legal Liabilities of Criminal Justice

This course is an examination of the liability issues that challenge criminal justice professionals in the performance of their duties. The course will result in an examination of how management and administration in criminal justice relates to ethical, civil, and criminal behaviors of personnel.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 7120 - Forensic Behavioral Analysis

The purpose of this course is to examine criminal behavior through a psychological perspective. Upon completion of this course, students should have acquired knowledge regarding the major psychological theories of criminal behavior as well as specific psychological disorders that potentially contribute to criminal behavior, such as personality disorders, impulse control disorders, and sexual disorders. Students will study the behaviors and traits of the perpetrators and victims of such crimes as, serial murder, rape, child molestation, domestic homicide, mass murder, and serial arson. The course will also familiarize students with various techniques for analyzing and understanding criminal behavior though crime scene analysis. These techniques include an introduction to the fundamentals of criminal investigative analysis, criminal profiling, risk assessment, and interview strategies. Critical thinking skills are emphasized by the utilization of case studies that will involved an analysis of offender psychopathology, modus operandi, and signature.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 6325 - Homeland Security

This course is a study of federal, state, local, and private and other organizational entities involved in homeland security. It addresses the evolution of homeland security from early to modern times with an emphasis on the emerging homeland security structure, culture, and organization. Students will evaluate contemporary homeland security issues and policies, and critically compare and contrast them. Additional topics include emergency management, national and international laws that impact homeland security, the protection of civil liberties, the bureaucracy of managing homeland security, and the modern threat of cyber, international, and domestic terrorism, and weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Pre-requisite: CRJU 1100 or acceptance into the MSCJ program.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 6350 - Family Violence

An interdisciplinary examination of the main areas of family violence: spousal abuse, child abuse, sibling violence, etc. Research in the field will be reviewed for factors related to causation and prevention.

Hours:
3

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CRJU 6440 - Criminal Justice Administration

The course includes an overview of management and administration in criminal justice agencies. The course examines organizational structure, communication, leadership, motivation, employee evaluation and supervision as well as external environmental demands and situations. There is an emphasis on the role of the criminal justice administrator in policy formulation and program development.

Hours:
3

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POLS 7201 - International Security Issues

This course is designed as an examination of both traditional and non-traditional security concerns. The course will highlight the importance of context and the development of decision-making skills by those that craft foreign policy and military missions. All elements of security will be examined: military security, environmental security and resource security. The graduate portion of this course will expand discussions beyond traditional national borders to examine regional and global trends in security studies. The graduate student will be expected to synthesize the activities of their particular state within both regional and international security structures.

Hours:
3

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POLS 7230 - National Security Policy of the United States

The aim of this course is to provide students with an understanding of the U.S. national security process and how it develops, executes and implements policy for the issues that face America in the 21st century. We will spend significant amounts of time discussing the major actors in the National Security Establishment (the Presidency, National Security Council, Congress, the Military, the Intelligence community, the judiciary, public and media) and how they participate in a process your textbook author Sam Sarkesian calls "somewhat of a mystery or `muddling through'" (181). Structure and theory are applied to organize, clarify and understand this process, and historical and modern-day examples are used in extensive class discussion to connect process to policy. A semester-long research project affords the student an opportunity to apply this process to a topic of specific interest in U.S. national security policy.

Hours:
3

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POLS 7244 - International Political Violence

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the impacts of terrorism and political violence on the world system. The pressures of globalization have caused significant changes in the abilities of terrorists to take on action of global importance.

Hours:
3

View Course in Catalog

Course Notes

  • CRJU 6440: Course exists as part of the MPA program.
  • POLS 7201, POLS 7230, POLS 7244: Courses exist as part of the MAIA program.

Capstone: 3 Semester Hours

CRJU 7500 - Comprehensive Seminar

A capstone course designed to strengthen the analysis and comparison of various theories and methodological models as they pertain to criminal justice issues in a global society. Emphasis is on the critical examination of current trends and research in criminal justice as well as design and implementation of criminal justice research.

Hours:
3

View Course in Catalog

Typical Course Rotation

Fall

CRJU 7001 - Criminological Theory (Hayes)
CRJU 7002 - Research Methodology (Hayes)
CRJU 7115 - Corrections and Penology (Batchelder)
CRJU 6350 - Family Violence (Foster)
CRJU 6325 - Homeland Security (Orr)

Spring

CRJU 7005 - Global Crime and Justice (Hayes)
CRJU 7010 - Criminal Justice Policy (Hayes)
CRJU 7500 - Comprehensive Seminar (Hayes)
CRJU 7120 - Forensic Behavior Analysis (Orr)

Summer

CRJU 6325 - Homeland Security (Orr)
CRJU 6440 - Criminal Justice Administration (Orr)
CRJU 7112 - Police and Society (Hayes)
CRJU 7003 - Statistics for Criminal Justice (Batchelder)
CRJU 6350 - Family Violence (Foster)

Notice Regarding Online Offerings

In compliance with state authorization for the delivery of distance education, UNG online courses, degrees and certificate programs are not available in some states. If you are not a Georgia resident, email onlineapproval@ung.edu to check program availability in your state. This email address is exclusively for questions regarding state authorization of online offerings. Other inquiries should be directed to the academic department offering the online program or to Graduate Admissions.

International applicants who must be issued an F-1 visa by UNG to enter the United States to attend school may not apply for completely online programs or part-time programs (less than nine hours fall and spring semesters).

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