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The University of North Georgia and the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute Present:

Symposium on Leadership in a Complex World: Private Military Security Companies' Influence on International Security and Foreign Policy

The Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies, the College of Arts and Letters and the UNG Press in partnership with the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute are pleased to announce a symposium on Leadership in a Complex World:  Private Military Security Companies' Influence on International Security and Foreign Policy. The symposium will contribute to the scholarly discussion of this increasingly complex and important issue. U.S. or international scholars, graduate, and undergraduate students are invited to submit abstracts for papers or posters on topics related to the theme.

The symposium review committee will select the most relevant and highest quality submissions for between nine and twelve scholars to present and discuss at the symposium. Undergraduate submissions will be considered for poster sessions. Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to present as members of panels during the symposium. Extended papers from the selected abstracts will be published by the University of North Georgia Press in a peer-reviewed and edited symposium monograph.

Registration for the conference is free. Fill out the form below to register.

Co-Hosted With

The U.S. Army War College
Strategic Studies Institute
Strategic Studies Institute

Date

November 14 - 15, 2018

Location

University of North Georgia
Dahlonega Campus
Convocation Center

Accessibility

If you need closed captioning for this event, please email Keith Antonia or call 706 867-4576.

Schedule

Tuesday, November 13

Time Event
6:00 p.m.  Dinner by invitation with presenters, speakers, symposium organizing group

Wednesday, November 14

Time Event
8:00 a.m. Registration
8:30 a.m. Welcome, administrative remarks and introduce guests and presenters
8:45 a.m. Speaker: Mr. Eeben Barlow, CEO of STTEP International, Ltd. & Author
Topic: The Influence of Private Military Security Companies on International Security and Foreign Policy
9:15 a.m. Q&A
9:30 a.m. Break
9:45 a.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: Influences in Foreign Policy
Moderator: Dr. Dan Papp, Consultant, Pendleton Group & Scholar of International Affairs and Policy, Former President of Kennesaw State University
10:45 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
11:00 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions & Book Sales
11:15 a.m. Speaker: Dr. Birthe Anders, Senior Fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and Non-resident Fellow at West Point's Modern War Institute
Topic: Where two worlds collide? Private Security and Humanitarian Aid
11:45 a.m. Q&A
12:00 p.m. Lunch
1:45 p.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: Governance, Laws and Ethical Standards
Moderator: Dr. Molly Dunigan, Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of Defense and Political Sciences at RAND Corporation
2:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
3:00 p.m. Break - Poster Sessions & Book Sales
3:15 p.m. Speaker: Mr. Erik Prince, CEO and Executive Director, Frontier Services Group & Author
Topic: Private Sector Contributions to Our National Security Past, Present, and Future
3:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
4:00 p.m. Break - Poster Sessions & Book Sales
4:15 p.m. Speaker: Laura Dickinson, Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School & Author
4:45 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
5:00 p.m. Break
6:30 p.m. Social and Book Signings by Speaker-Authors at the Smith House
8:00 p.m. End of Day 1 Activities

Thursday, November 15

Time Event
8:30 a.m. Registration
8:45 a.m. Welcome, administrative remarks and introduce guests and presenters
9:00 a.m. Speaker: Dr. Molly Dunigan, Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of Defense and Political Sciences at RAND Corporation & Author
Topic: The Health and Wellbeing of Private Contractors Working in Conflict Environments: Individual and Strategic Considerations
9:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
9:45 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions & Book Sales
10:00 a.m.

Speaker: Dr. Sean McFate, Professor of Strategy, National Defense University and Georgetown University School of Foreign Service & Author
Topic: The Future of Private Warfare

10:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
10:45 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions & Book Sales
11:00 a.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: Nation-state Stability and Leadership Challenges
Moderator: Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff, Army War College Strategic Studies Institute, Research Professor for the Military Profession and Ethic
12:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
12:15 p.m. Closing Remarks
12:30 p.m. End of Symposium
Speakers

Dr. Molly Dunigan

Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of Defense and Political Sciences at RAND Corporation & Author

Molly Dunigan is a Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of the Defense and Political Sciences Department at the RAND Corporation, and a lecturer in Carnegie Mellon University's Institute for Politics and Strategy. Her research interests focus on private military and security contractors, civil–military relations, irregular warfare, counterinsurgency, maritime security, and civilian deployment. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including a U.S. Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Peace Fellowship, a U.S. State Department Foreign Language Areas Studies Fellowship, and an International Studies Association Catalytic Research Grant. Prominent among Dunigan's published work are Victory for Hire: Private Security Companies' Impact on Military Effectiveness (Stanford University Press, 2011), The Markets for Force: Privatization of Security Across World Regions (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), and the RAND reports Out of the Shadows: The Health and Well-Being of Private Contractors Working in Conflict Environments (Dunigan et al., 2013) and Expeditionary Civilians: Creating a Viable Practice of Department of Defense Civilian Deployment (Dunigan et al., 2016).

An internationally recognized expert on private security contracting, Dunigan's work on this topic has been cited in USA TodayTime MagazineWashington PostU.S. News & World Report, and Forbes. Dunigan's publications have been favorably reviewed in Military ReviewThe Journal of Military and Strategic StudiesThe Journal of Military HistorySurvivalParameters, and The Boston Globe, and her op-eds have appeared in The National InterestUSA TodayThe HillU.S. News & World Report, and The Christian Science Monitor. Dunigan received her Ph.D. in government from Cornell University.

Mr. Erik Prince

Executive Director & Chairman, Frontier Services Group & Author

Mr. Erik D. Prince has been appointed as an executive director and the Chairman of the Company since 10 January 2014. He is also chairman of the Nomination Committee and a committee member of the Remuneration Committee of the Company.

Mr. Prince is a US-born entrepreneur, philanthropist, military veteran and private equity investor with business interests in Africa, Europe, the Middle East and North America in the fields of logistics, aviation services, manufacturing, natural resources development and energy. He is the founder and chairman of Frontier Resource Group, a private equity firm active across the African continent in areas such as exploration, mining and energy development. Mr. Prince is the founder of Blackwater, a global private security company, which he sold in 2010 after successfully growing the company over the course of more than a decade into the premier provider of global security and logistics solutions to the United States Government and others. In addition, Mr. Prince purchased Presidential Airways in 2003 and grew it from a one-plane operation into a global logistics and aviation business with over 70 fixed and rotary wing aircraft operating in Africa, the Middle East and North America; he sold the company in 2010. Mr. Prince was educated at Hillsdale College. Upon graduation, he enlisted in the US Navy, where he served as a Navy SEAL officer until 1996.

Mr. Eeben Barlow

CEO of STTEP International, Ltd. & Author

Born in Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia), and raised in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Bechuanaland (now Botswana), Eeben Barlow became a naturalised South African citizen in 1966.

During his military career in the South African Defence Force (SADF), he served as an officer in several conventional, unconventional, and covert SADF units.

Commissioned in the SADF’s Corps of Engineers, he served as the sapper commander in several infantry battalions, and as second in command of 32 Battalion’s Reconnaissance Wing. Subsequently, he served as an EOD/IED team commander, an agent handler for Military Intelligence, and as both a regional commander and covert operative in the SA Special Forces’ covert operations group, the Civil Cooperation Bureau. During his military career, he pioneered several TTPs and was also the first commander of 44 Parachute Brigade’s airborne combat engineer troop.

When he became ‘politically expendable’ he founded Executive Outcomes Ltd, and was initially contracted to train SADF Special Forces operators in covert operations. As the founder and chairman of Executive Outcomes, he oversaw several major counter-crime operations, along with the initial defeat of UNITA in Angola, and the destruction of the RUF in Sierra Leone, as well as the rescue of western hostages in Indonesia (Irian Jaya).

He has written numerous articles on Africa, terrorism, intelligence, piracy, and military operations. In addition, he was a contributing editor to The Counter Terrorist magazine. He is the author of two best-selling books (Executive Outcomes: Against all Odds and Composite Warfare: The Conduct of Successful Ground Force operations in Africa). He was also a contributor to the African Union’s symposium on the African Standby Force.

He is currently the chairman of STTEP International Ltd, a company that actively supports governments in Africa. He holds the rank of Maj Gen in several African armies. He lectures at numerous military colleges and universities in Africa and abroad, and is also a political and security advisor to several African governments.

Dr. Sean McFate

Professor of Strategy, National Defense University and Georgetown University School of Foreign Service & Author

Dr. Sean McFate is an author, novelist and expert in foreign policy and national security strategy. He is a professor at the National Defense University and Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service. His newest book The New Rules of War: Victory in the Age of Durable Disorder (William Morrow) will be released January 22, 2019.

Recently, he was a Visiting Scholar at Oxford University’s Changing Character of War Program. He was also a think tank scholar at the RAND Corporation, Atlantic Council, Bipartisan Policy Center, and New America Foundation.

McFate’s career began as a paratrooper and officer in the U.S. Army’s storied 82nd Airborne Division. He served under Stanley McChrystal and David Petraeus, and graduated from elite training programs, such as Jungle Warfare School in Panama. He was also a Jump Master.

Following this, McFate became a private military contractor in Africa. Among his many experiences, he dealt with warlords, raised small armies, worked with armed groups in the Sahara, transacted arms deals in Eastern Europe, and helped prevent an impending genocide in the Rwanda region.

McFate authored the non-fiction book The Modern Mercenary: Private Armies and What They Mean for World Order (Oxford University Press) which explains how the privatization of war is changing world order. The Economist called it a “fascinating and disturbing book.” He also co-wrote the novels Shadow War and Deep Black (William Morrow), part of the Tom Locke series based on his military experiences. New York Times #1 bestselling author Mark Greaney said: “I was blown away…. simply one of the most entertaining and intriguing books I’ve read in quite some time.”

A coveted speaker, he has appeared before the British House of Commons, top universities and popular audience venues. He has written for the New York Times, Washington Post, The Atlantic, The New Republic, Foreign Policy, Politico, Daily Beast, CNBC, Vice Magazine, Aeon, War on the Rocks, Military Review and African Affairs. He has appeared in the Wall Street Journal, MSNBC, Fox News, NPR, BBC, Economist, Vice/HBO, The Discovery Channel, and American Heroes Channel. As a scholar, he has authored eight book chapters in edited academic volumes and published a monograph for the U.S. Army War College on how to raise foreign armies.

McFate holds a B.A. from Brown University, M.P.P. from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and a Ph.D. in international relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). He lives in Washington, DC.

Dr. Birthe Anders

Senior Fellow, Harvard Humanitarian Initiative and Non-resident Fellow at West Point's Modern War Institute

Birthe holds a Ph.D. in War Studies from the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, and a Diplom in Political Science and Law from Philipps Universität Marburg, Germany. Her research focuses on Private Military and Security Companies (PMSCs), NGO security and civil-military relations. In addition she has also conducted research on IHL, particularly the regulation of PMSCs and on German and European Defense and Security Policy, including on maritime security. From 2015/16 she was Fritz Thyssen Fellow at the Weatherhead Center for International Affairs, Harvard University. Before coming to Harvard she taught in the Department of War Studies, King’s College London, where she co-founded the Private Military and Security Research Group. She has published in Parameters, Small Wars & Insurgencies, International Peacekeeping, with Routledge and Oxford University Press (forthcoming).  

dickinson-laura.jpgLaura Dickinson

Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law, George Washington University Law School & Author

Laura A. Dickinson joined GW Law in 2011 as the Oswald Symister Colclough Research Professor of Law. Her work focuses on national security, human rights, foreign affairs privatization, and qualitative empirical approaches to international law. Professor Dickinson’s book, Outsourcing War and Peace, published by Yale University Press in 2011, examines the increasing privatization of military, security, and foreign aid functions of government, considers the impact of this trend on core public values, and outlines mechanisms for protecting these values in an era of privatization.

In addition to her scholarly activities, Professor Dickinson has a distinguished record of government service. She served as Special Counsel to the General Counsel of the Department of Defense and was awarded the Secretary of Defense Medal for Exceptional Public Service for her work there. She has also served as a senior policy adviser to Harold Hongju Koh, Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor at the U.S. Department of State, and is a former law clerk to U.S. Supreme Court Justices Harry A. Blackmun and Stephen G. Breyer, and to Judge Dorothy Nelson of the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Prior to her position at GW, Professor Dickinson was, from 2008-11, the Foundation Professor of Law and the faculty director of the Center for Law and Global Affairs at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University (ASU). She has also been on the faculty of the University of Connecticut School of Law, where she taught from 2001 to 2008, and she was a Visiting Research Scholar and Visiting Professor in the Law and Public Affairs Program at Princeton University in 2006-2007.

Professor Dickinson is currently a Future of War Fellow with the New America Foundation's International Security Program and Co-chair of the International Law and Technology Section of the American Society of international Law. She has previously served as a member of the Executive Council of the American Society of International Law, and co-organizer of a Collaborative Research Network on Empirical Approaches to International Human Rights Law, convened under the auspices of the Law & Society Association.

Panels

Theme: Influences in Foreign Policy

Panelist

Dr. Kiril Avramov

Dr. Kiril Avramov Post-Doctoral Research Fellow of Intelligence Studies Project, University of Texas at Austin

Dr. Kiril Avramov is a post-doctoral research fellow of the Intelligence Studies Project (ISP) at the University of Texas at Austin.

Dr. Avramov was until December 2017 the Acting Vice-Rector for International Relations and Research at the New Bulgarian University (NBU) in Sofia, Bulgaria and an Assistant Professor of Political Science at NBU. He studied previously at Gustavus Adolphus College (USA/MN), the University of Aberdeen (Scotland), University of Sofia (Bulgaria), Central European University (Hungary), and NBU. He taught in the Department of Political Science at the University of Sofia until 2005 and, from 2006-2010, was also the Director of the international consultancy and research institute “Political Capital” in Bulgaria. In 2010, he was appointed as the Director for International Relations of Political Capital at the firm’s headquarters in Budapest.

Dr. Avramov’s main research interests are information warfare, psychological operations and mass cognitive hacking, as well as the “weaponization of information” and their respective application and effects on individual and group decision-making processes in the Central and Eastern Europe and MENA regions. Additional areas of interest include political elites’ and non-elites’ decision-making resilience mechanisms and radicalization in post-transition democracies during identified active “psy-ops” and third-party information operations. 

Dr. Avramov was a Fulbright Senior Visiting Research Scholar at the Center for Russian, East European and Eurasian Studies (CREEES) at the University of Texas at Austin in 2015-2016. He earned a full scholarship for his PhD research at the University of Sofia and received an “Open Society Institute-Sofia” scholarship for his year-long PhD specialization at the Central European University in Budapest.

Dr. Abel Esterhuyse

Dr. Abel Esterhuyse Associate Professor of Strategy, Faculty of Military Science of Stellenbosch University at the South African Military Academy

Abel Esterhuyse is an associate professor of strategy in the Faculty of Military Science of Stellenbosch University at the South African Military Academy. He is also a research associate of the Centre for Conflict, Rule of Law and Society (CRoLS) at the Bournemouth University in the UK.

Holding a PhD from the University of Stellenbosch, he is also a graduate of:

  • The Senior Leadership Programme of the African Center for Strategic Studies in Washington DC.
  • The Summer Programme in Military History at the US Military Academy, West Point,
  • The Programme on the Analysis of Military Operations and Strategy (SWAMOS) of Columbia University’s Saltzman Institute of War and Peace Studies in New York.

As academic he -

  • Participated in more than 40 subject-related conferences in more than 15 countries;
  • Published 32 peer-reviewed accredited academic journal articles;
  • Published 9 book chapters;
  • Edited 3 book publications.

Prof Esterhuyse is a rated scientist of the South African National Research Foundation. His most recent publication, titled The practice of strategy: South African defence in stasis, was published in the British journal Defence & Security Analysis.

Dr. Molly Dunigan

Dr. Molly Dunigan
Dr. Molly Dunigan Senior Political Scientist, Associate Director of the Defense and Political Sciences Department at the RAND Corporation, Lecturer in Carnegie Mellon University's Institute for Politics and Strategy

Molly Dunigan is a Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of the Defense and Political Sciences Department at the RAND Corporation, and a lecturer in Carnegie Mellon University's Institute for Politics and Strategy. Her research interests focus on private military and security contractors, civil–military relations, irregular warfare, counterinsurgency, maritime security, and civilian deployment. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including a U.S. Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Peace Fellowship, a U.S. State Department Foreign Language Areas Studies Fellowship, and an International Studies Association Catalytic Research Grant. Prominent among Dunigan's published work are Victory for Hire: Private Security Companies' Impact on Military Effectiveness(Stanford University Press, 2011), The Markets for Force: Privatization of Security Across World Regions (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), and the RAND reports Out of the Shadows: The Health and Well-Being of Private Contractors Working in Conflict Environments (Dunigan et al., 2013) and Expeditionary Civilians: Creating a Viable Practice of Department of Defense Civilian Deployment (Dunigan et al., 2016).

An internationally recognized expert on private security contracting, Dunigan's work on this topic has been cited in USA TodayTime MagazineWashington PostU.S. News & World Report, and Forbes. Dunigan's publications have been favorably reviewed in Military ReviewThe Journal of Military and Strategic StudiesThe Journal of Military HistorySurvivalParameters, and The Boston Globe, and her op-eds have appeared in The National InterestUSA TodayThe HillU.S. News & World Report, and The Christian Science Monitor. Dunigan received her Ph.D. in government from Cornell University.

Mr. Johan Raath

Mr. Johan Raath

Johan Raath was a private military contractor in Iraq from 2004, where he performed specialized protection tasks for VIPs and sheiks, engineers working on construction projects funded by the US government, oilfield engineers and construction workers. 

His tasks, as country security manager for a large consortium of companies, involved setting up missions by liaising with the US military, the Iraqi security forces, tribal leaders and other local stakeholders, and establishing intelligence sources. These multifaceted missions encompassed all components of high-risk security work - personal protection, perimeter security, force protection measures, explosive detection capabilities, convoy security, air operations, and maritime patrols. 

Raath was a South African Special Forces operator, or Recce, from 1986 to 1992. Then he started a security training and consulting company and went into high-risk security work in Africa. Since the 1990s, he was involved in security missions in over 15 countries, including conflict zones such as Libya, southern Sudan, Sierra Leone, Haiti, and the Middle East. 

Raath also worked as a personal security officer, or bodyguard, for a number of international presidents. His training and protection services have won him accolades from many government organizations, including US government agencies and USAID. 

He is also a trained combat paramedic and assisted in various mass casualty scenarios after suicide bomb attacks in Iraq. He is a close-protection and specialized combat instructor, and has trained international security teams in various countries. 

From 2015 to 2017, Raath was part of the senior Iraq Country Management team for one of the largest US private security companies in the world, in support of various US diplomatic protective services.

Moderator

Dr. Dan Papp

Dr. Daniel S. Papp Consultant, Pendleton Group & Scholar of International Affairs and Policy, Former President of Kennesaw State University

Dr. Daniel S. Papp retired as President of Kennesaw State University (KSU) in 2016.  Since his retirement, he has served as President of Papp Consulting LLC.

During his 10 years as president, Papp led the consolidation of KSU and Southern Polytechnic State, making KSU one of the 50 largest U.S. universities; initiated its first doctoral programs; led KSU’s first capital campaign; added over $500 million of facilities; guided KSU into NCAA Division I athletics including intercollegiate football; expanded KSU’s external funded research; and doubled KSU’s study abroad program, including opening KSU’s first international campus.

Before becoming KSU President, Papp was Senior Vice Chancellor for Academics and Fiscal Affairs of the University System of Georgia (USG); Interim President of Southern Polytechnic; Executive Assistant to the President of Georgia Tech; Founding Director of Tech’s Sam Nunn School of International Affairs; and Director of Tech’s School of Social Sciences.

Papp has been Senior Research Scholar at both the Center for Aerospace Doctrine of the Air War College and the Strategic Studies Institute of the Army War College.  The Army twice awarded him the “Outstanding Civilian Service” medal.  He also has been Visiting Professor at Western Australia Institute of Technology in Perth; Visiting Professor at Fudan University in Shanghai; and led study abroad programs to the Soviet Union, France, Germany, and Italy.   

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Dartmouth College, Dr. Papp earned his Ph.D. in International Affairs from the University of Miami.  He is the author, co-author, or editor of 14 books and over 80 articles on U.S. and Soviet/Russian foreign policy and international relations, including former Secretary of State Dean Rusk’s autobiography, As I Saw It.

Theme: Governance, Laws and Ethical Standards

Panelist

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff is the Research Professor for the Military Profession and Ethic at the U.S. Army War Colleges Strategic Studies Institute. A retired Army colonel, Dr. Pfaff recently served as Director for Iraq on the National Security Council Staff. While on active duty, he served on the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department, as the Defense Attaché in Baghdad, the Chief of International Military Affairs for US Army Central Command, and as the Defense Attaché in Kuwait. He served twice in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, once as the Deputy J2 for a Joint Special Operations Task Force and as the Senior Military Advisor for the Civilian Police Assistance Training Team. He also served as the Senior Intelligence Officer on the Iraq Intelligence Task Force and as a UN observer along the Iraq-Kuwait border. Dr. Pfaff has a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Economics from Washington and Lee University, a master’s degree in Philosophy from Stanford University; a master’s in National Resource Management from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces; and a Doctorate in Philosophy from Georgetown University.

Colonel (Ret.) Mark Cancian

Colonel (Ret.) Mark Cancian Senior Adviser, CSIS International Security Program

Mark Cancian (Colonel, USMCR, ret.) is a senior adviser with the CSIS International Security Program. He joined CSIS in April 2015 from the Office of Management and Budget, where he spent more than seven years as chief of the Force Structure and Investment Division, working on issues such as Department of Defense budget strategy, war funding, and procurement programs, as well as nuclear weapons development and nonproliferation activities in the Department of Energy. Previously, he worked on force structure and acquisition issues in the Office of the Secretary of Defense and ran research and executive programs at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. In the military, Colonel Cancian spent over three decades in the U.S. Marine Corps, active and reserve, serving as an infantry, artillery, and civil affairs officer and on overseas tours in Vietnam, Desert Storm, and Iraq (twice). Since 2000, he has been an adjunct faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Advanced International Studies, where he teaches a course on the connection between policy and analysis. A prolific author, he has published over 40 articles on military operations, acquisition, budgets, and strategy and received numerous writing awards. He graduated with high honors (magna cum laude) from Harvard College and with highest honors (Baker scholar) from Harvard Business School.

Ms. Caroline Batka

Ms. Caroline Batka Doctoral Candidate, Comenius University

Caroline Batka is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Political Science at Comenius University in Bratislava, Slovakia. Batka’s dissertation research focuses on the institutional components of DoD that hinder and facilitate integration of operational contractors into strategy. She has a broad range of research interests, skills, and experience. From October 2011 to July 2016, Batka worked at RAND Corporation in Washington, D.C. where her research focused on Army operations and planning, military programs and policy, health care, and veterans’ issues. Prior to working at RAND, Batka was a Research Associate at the National Academy of Public Administration. Batka has also worked at the U.S. Government Accountability Office, the Disabled American Veterans, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Batka has a Master of Public Administration from the University of Washington in Seattle and a Bachelor of Arts in Political Science and Communication from Virginia Tech.

Mr. Chris Rothery

Mr. Chris Rothery Senior Lecturer, Massey University

Chris Rothery is a senior lecturer with the Centre for Defence and Security Studies at Massey University, New Zealand. He teaches undergraduate and postgraduate papers in military command, operational planning and conventional warfare. Chris has a Master of Military and Defence Studies degree from the Australian National University and a Master of Arts degree from the University of Waikato. He is also a graduate from the Australian Command and Staff College. Chris served 21 years as a Combat Engineer Officer in the New Zealand Army. He held a variety of command positions within the engineer regiment, including serving as a commander for a Combat Engineer Squadron and the Emergency Response Squadron. Chris also held the post as the Chief Instructor at the School of Military Engineering. In addition to his regimental positions, he served as the Director of Army Recruiting and the Operations Officer with the Deployable Joint Inter-Agency Task Force. During his military career Chris conducted operational tours to East Timor and Afghanistan, as well as several humanitarian and disaster relief missions domestically and in the Pacific. Chris has recently completed research into New Zealand’s national security framework and is now focussing on the challenges that climate change will present to New Zealand’s national security.

Moderator

Dr. Molly Dunigan

Dr. Molly Dunigan
Dr. Molly Dunigan Senior Political Scientist, Associate Director of the Defense and Political Sciences Department at the RAND Corporation, Lecturer in Carnegie Mellon University's Institute for Politics and Strategy

Molly Dunigan is a Senior Political Scientist and Associate Director of the Defense and Political Sciences Department at the RAND Corporation, and a lecturer in Carnegie Mellon University's Institute for Politics and Strategy. Her research interests focus on private military and security contractors, civil–military relations, irregular warfare, counterinsurgency, maritime security, and civilian deployment. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including a U.S. Institute of Peace Jennings Randolph Peace Fellowship, a U.S. State Department Foreign Language Areas Studies Fellowship, and an International Studies Association Catalytic Research Grant. Prominent among Dunigan's published work are Victory for Hire: Private Security Companies' Impact on Military Effectiveness(Stanford University Press, 2011), The Markets for Force: Privatization of Security Across World Regions (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015), and the RAND reports Out of the Shadows: The Health and Well-Being of Private Contractors Working in Conflict Environments (Dunigan et al., 2013) and Expeditionary Civilians: Creating a Viable Practice of Department of Defense Civilian Deployment (Dunigan et al., 2016).

An internationally recognized expert on private security contracting, Dunigan's work on this topic has been cited in USA TodayTime MagazineWashington PostU.S. News & World Report, and Forbes. Dunigan's publications have been favorably reviewed in Military ReviewThe Journal of Military and Strategic StudiesThe Journal of Military HistorySurvivalParameters, and The Boston Globe, and her op-eds have appeared in The National InterestUSA TodayThe HillU.S. News & World Report, and The Christian Science Monitor. Dunigan received her Ph.D. in government from Cornell University.

Theme: Nation-state Stability and Leadership Challenges

Panelist

Mr. JD Work

Mr. JD Work Bren Chair for Cyber Conflict and Security, Marine Corps University

JD Work serves as the Bren Chair for Cyber Conflict and Security at the Marine Corps University, where he leads research to develop the theory and practice of the cyber warfighting function across national security strategy, operational design, and tactical planning. He further supports professional military education to prepare leaders to think critically and act decisively in the face of the ambiguity, fog, friction, and chance inherent within modern warfare and other missions in a complex security environment. Mr. Work also directs international research programs for the Cyber Conflict Documentation Project, a nonprofit academic collaboration that seeks to provide insight into the emerging strategic issues, economic consequences, and technology implications created by hostilities in the virtual domain. Mr. Work leads the Project's efforts to establish a reliable baseline of observations regarding the engagements, follow on effects, capabilities, doctrine, and drivers behind the antagonistic action of potential combatants in the networked environment. This nonpartisan and apolitical research serves to support network operators, policymakers, investors, civil society, and other stakeholders in formulating options for early warning, crisis management and crisis prevention both in and through cyberspace. Mr. Work has over 20 years of experience addressing complex transnational issues and asymmetric threats. He previously spent more than a decade working in cyber intelligence and information operations roles on behalf of the private sector and US government. Since 2001, Mr. Work has developed and taught analytic tradecraft courses at a number of academic institutions and US government agencies. He now continues to teach as Adjunct Associate Professor with Columbia University, School of International and Public Affairs.

Dr. Edward Mienie

Dr. Edward L. Mienie University of North Georgia (UNG) Department of Political Science and International Affairs

Dr. Edward L. Mienie is the Executive Director of Strategic & Security Studies and an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science & International Affairs. Dr. Mienie has more than 20 years of experience working in international relations and business, media relations, and coalition building. He earned a bachelor’s degree in law from the University of South Africa and received his doctorate in international conflict management while teaching and leading the academic exchange program with South Africa at Kennesaw State University. He is fluent in English, Afrikaans, and German. He served in the Diplomatic Corps of South Africa from 1987-1998, including four years as Deputy-Ambassador to Switzerland, and four years as the Political Advisor to the Ambassador and US Government/Congressional Liaison, Washington, D.C., 1989-1992. Dr. Mienie is also a veteran of the South African Army, having served four years’ active duty in the Infantry during the Angolan War from 1979-1983. His research interests include: State Fragility; Role of Public Diplomacy in Conflict Management; Intelligence and Counter-Terrorism; Nuclear Non-Proliferation.

Dr. Bryson Payne

Dr. Bryson Payne Director, Center for Cyber Operations Education, Tenured Professor

Dr. Bryson Payne is a TEDx speaker, best-selling author, and the founding Director of the Center for Cyber Operations Education at the University of North Georgia, an NSA Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense. He is a tenured professor of computer science at UNG, where he has taught aspiring coders and cyber professionals since 1998. He is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP®) and Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), and he holds the elite SANS|GIAC GPEN certification, among other industry certifications. He was also the first Department Head of Computer Science at UNG and enjoys working with K-12 schools worldwide to promote computer science education.

Featured in CIO magazine, Campus Technology, and the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Payne is the best-selling author of Teach Your Kids to Code: A Parent-Friendly Guide to Python Programming (2015, No Starch Press), now published in six languages (Russian, Chinese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, and English), Learn Java the Easy Way (2017, No Starch Press), and Hacking for Kids (2019, No Starch Press). He’s a popular online instructor with over 30,000 students from more than 160 countries, known for his top-rated Udemy course, Real-World Ethical Hacking (2017).

He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia State University and has published articles in scholarly and trade journals, in addition to speaking regularly at national and international conferences on computer science and cybersecurity education.

Mr. Brad Regeski

Mr. Bradford Regeski

Brad Regeski is a senior undergraduate student at the University of North Georgia, pursuing a Bachelor's of Science in Computer Science with a Cybersecurity minor, and has presented at many conferences across the Southeast region, including the University of North Georgia Civil-Military Symposium, UNG Annual Research Conference and Augusta TechNet 2018 Conference. He was a member of Operation: Locked Shields with the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), an international network defense exercise, and currently works for Continuum's Security Division, responding to ransomware and working with clients across the globe. He is a volunteer web page developer and technical advisor for multiple establishments in the Dahlonega area, hoping to encourage local business and modernize neighborhood services. He is an active security researcher, studying multiple topics, such as Artificial Intelligence in Intrusion Detection Systems, Social Engineering and Incident Response.

CAPT Michael Junge

Captain Michael Junge Capt., U.S. Navy

Captain Michael Junge, USN is a Surface Warfare Officer and served afloat in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD 980), USS UNDERWOOD (FFG 36), USS WASP (LHD 1), USS THE SULLIVANS (DDG 68) and was the 14th Commanding Officer of USS WHIDBEY ISLAND (LSD 41). Ashore he served with Navy Recruiting; Assault Craft Unit FOUR; Deputy Commandant for Programs and Resources, Headquarters, Marine Corps; Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Communication Networks (N6); and with the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He has written extensively with articles appearing in the United States Naval Institute Proceedings magazine, US Naval War College’s Luce.nt, and on the blog “Information Dissemination”.

Moderator

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff is the Research Professor for the Military Profession and Ethic at the U.S. Army War Colleges Strategic Studies Institute. A retired Army colonel, Dr. Pfaff recently served as Director for Iraq on the National Security Council Staff. While on active duty, he served on the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department, as the Defense Attaché in Baghdad, the Chief of International Military Affairs for US Army Central Command, and as the Defense Attaché in Kuwait. He served twice in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, once as the Deputy J2 for a Joint Special Operations Task Force and as the Senior Military Advisor for the Civilian Police Assistance Training Team. He also served as the Senior Intelligence Officer on the Iraq Intelligence Task Force and as a UN observer along the Iraq-Kuwait border. Dr. Pfaff has a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Economics from Washington and Lee University, a master’s degree in Philosophy from Stanford University; a master’s in National Resource Management from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces; and a Doctorate in Philosophy from Georgetown University.

Posters

Mr. Aleksander Kondrusik - International Security and Foreign Policy in the Era of Private Military Security Companies

Mr. Aleksander Kondrusik

Tadeusz Kosciuszko Academy (MALF)
Poland

Bio

Aleksander KONDRUSIK is an Sargeant Cadet and student at the Military University of Land Forces in Wroclaw. He got accepted into MULF in 2015 at 19th place from 144 available, in Airmobile Corps.
During his military career he was assigned as squad leader until 2017, he performed
20 parachute jumps, took parts in training with 25th Air Cavalry Brigade and 6th Airborne Brigade and represented Academy in many strength sport events. 

Apart from studying, Aleksander enjoys sports and working with people. He is an active instructor in The Polish Scouting and Guiding Association. Also, he is a member of Bench Press Section in Military University of Land Forces, competing both in military and civilian contests.

Mr. Talifhani Ratshivhadelo - Private Military Security Companies Influence on Internation Security and Foreign Policy

Mr. Talifhani Ratshivhadelo

Stellenbosch University
Stellenbosch

Bio

Talifhani Victor Ratshivhadelo is an undergraduate student in security and Africa studies at Stellenbosch University’s Faculty of Military Science at South African Military Academy. He served in the parachute battalion for 11 years. Ratshivhadelo successfully completed Basic Static Line Jump Course and Advance Static Line Jump Course in 2007. He is also a Rope Work Instructor and Climbing Technique qualified. He has been deployed in the United Nation’s peacekeeping mission in Democratic Republic of Congo (MONUSCO) in 2010 and was decorated for his role in the Battle of Bangui in the Central African Republic in 2013.

Abstract

Private Military Security Companies (PMSCs) is corporate bodies that provide military expertise and other professional services essential to combat and warfare to the legitimate government by providing military skills including training, planning, intelligence, operational support, recruitment and technical support. The challenge come when PMSCs sometimes find themselves using armed force in service of their employees without legal definition in domestic and international law. This challenge is a particularly relevant one in Africa where a number of PMSCs are involved in combat-type services.

Because PMSCs do not operate within their home countries, the enforcement of domestic laws is extremely difficult. The issue of the regulation of PMSCs is filled with difficulty and current regulations are vague with an emphasis on self–regulation. The option of self-regulation has raised concern especially where activities of such service may lead to or result in violation of existing rules on International Human Right and Humanitarian Law. Self-regulation by PMSCs is not sufficient to ensure the observance of international humanitarian law and human rights law by the personnel of these companies.

It is up to each state to draft and enact national legislation. South Africa has the Regulation of Foreign Military Assistance Act 1998 which is aimed to ban mercenary activities and to regulate the provision of military assistance outside South Africa. The paper explores the importance of South African legislation of Foreign Military Assistance Acts and the challenges thereof.

Mr. Josesf Varga - Wagner PMC – Putin's Mercenaries Serving in Syria

Mr. Josesf Varga

National University of Public Service (NUPS)
Hungary

Bio

I was born in Eger Hungary in 01.17.1995. I joined the Hungarian Defense Forces (HDF) in August of 2015. At the moment I attend the National University of Public Service at Budapest, to be a reconnaissance officer.
I am assigned to the following unit: Ludovika Battalion.

My military and civilian education includes the HDF Parachute level: Combat Ready, HDF First Responder, Stanag 2.2.2.2, European Computer Driving License (ECDL), driving license for civilian cars, and I am qualified to operate U.S. Army standard M115A1/F5, M1097A1, M1097A2 vehicles.

I have a big family of 5 people, my parents and my two siblings. My father is a retired homicide and economic investigator, also a Lieutenant Colonel, and I would like to follow his footsteps, and go further in the army field. In my free time, I do lots of training, some sports, like tennis and I read about history, especially wars and battles.

Mr. Thiago Mukhail Scantamburlo

Mr. Thiago Mukhail Scantamburlo

Academia Militar das Agulhas Negras (AMAN)
Brazil

Bio

My name is Thiago Mikhail Scantamburlo, I am 23 years old and was born and raised in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. I had only two military relatives when I decided to join the army, my grandfather who was a sergeant of the air force ad my cousin who was an army cadet. I joined the army in 2014 after passing the test for EsPCEx that is a military preparatory school for army cadets, where you spend a year learning and adapting to the military life before going to the Agulhas Negras Military Academy (AMAN). In 2015 I was a first year cadet in AMAN, In 2016 I chose the Infantry branch and in 2017 I had the chance to do the Basic Paratrooper Course.

Abstract

The use of private military and security companies (PMSCs) has become common in conflicts over the last ten years. The United Nations has started making use of this kind of company, which are mainly used to establish the security of people and facilities and to provide training for troops. However, in some cases, these companies are employed as combat troops, what makes them stop acting as security companies and fall into the definition of mercenaries, as defined by the Additional Protocol I (AP I) to the Geneva Conventions and the UN Mercenary Convention. The objective of this paper is to examine the presence of one of these military security companies called the Wagner Group in Syria, taking into consideration their actions in the country; define whether they are acting as a security company or mercenaries in accordance with the international definitions. One hypothesis is that this company has more than two thousand men involved mainly with security for Russian bases and other military facilities in Syria. However, as the war dragged on, they started to assume a more active stance and engage in combat actions, helping the forces of President Bashar al-Assad.

Mr. Aleksandre Ugrelidze - Private Military Companies (PMC) in The Context of Influence on International Security and Foreign Policy

Mr. Aleksandre Ugrelidze

National Defence Academy of Georgia
Georgia

Bio

I am Aleksandre Ugrelidze. I was born on 3rd of October, 1996 in Borjomi, Georgia. I live in Bakuriani, Borjomi’s region, with my sister, Gvantsa Ugrelidze, and parents – father, Giorgi Ugrelidze and mother, Marine Ugrelidze. We have little hotel, so my parents are self-employed. My sister is a student and a professional dancer.

I was studying in Bakuriani’s public school till 2012, then I started studying in the Cadets’ Military Lyceum and I made the decision to continue education at the National Defence Academy of Georgia and afterwards serve my country and nation.

After three years, in 2015, I passed the national exams and enrolled at NDA (National Defence Academy), my academic major is – Defence and Security studies. After finishing the second year in the academy, in 2017, I was selected to take part in the Cadets` International Week in Vilnius.
Currently, I am the graduate student of the Academy.

Abstract

One of the main challenges to international security is the ever-increasing loss of the state's monopoly on the use of the military force. This is due to the frequent use of private military companies. In the 21st century, states often use services of such companies. They are authorized by states to solve special tasks and sometimes it happens that PMCs occupy an equal position with regular armies. Moreover, such structures will play an increasingly important role in armed conflicts and wars in the future. For example, if at the beginning of the 1990s there was only one "private military contractor" for 50 regular military personnel, in 2012 this ratio dropped to 10:1. The total income of publically traded PMCs, since 2004, exceeded $100bn globally.

The availability of well-trained and experienced security and military personnel has enabled governments, intergovernmental and nongovernmental organizations to avoid political limitations on the use of force. It means that anyone who has the opportunity to use the services of private military companies will apply it to fulfill their goals, but their main customers always were and will be the state governments.

The main problem, which is characteristic of private military companies, is the lack of civilian control. This is due to the fact that the activities of these companies are commercial in character, i.e., private. Also using of PMCs as a new instrument of foreign policy may cause some serious problems: the lack of human resources in the armed forces; Nepotism and/or good contacts with the government administration (There is an opinion that PMCs are using personnel contacts to get a contract from government); PMCs can avoid responsibility for the acts committed by their operators, etc.

It is very interesting that the existing conventions and agreements do not apply to private military companies, as the latter is intended only for regular army. So similar companies act in domestic regulations or ignore them altogether. It is therefore necessary to get a special document to regulate the activities of such companies. But here we encounter the problem, interference with the state or other subject in the activity of a private person. This is a violation of human rights, but at the same time it is necessary to regulate this business. The work on this problem should be continued in the future and should be involved in the agenda of international organizations.

In the near future, private military companies will still be the part of global security. It will have supporters and critics. Critics are concerned not only about the abuse of power but the transfer of state activities to private firms. The supporters want to expand the role of private companies, for example, their participation in peacekeeping operations.

Mr. Yuya Morita - Future Deployment of Private Security Companies. With Expansion of Self Defense Forces Overseas Missions

Mr. Yuya Morita

Japanese National Defense Academy (JNDA)
Japan

Bio

Yuya Morita is a junior at the National Defense Academy of Japan. He majors in International Relations, which is based on three major disciplines-international politics& diplomatic history, international law, and regional studies. He is particularly interested in Private Military Security Companies and want to learn most. Because he thinks in the future, SDF will limitedly deploy PMSC to carry out the overseas missions.
In the future, he will hope for self-defense ship duty. Through PKO and the training with the many countries, he wants to contribute to a stable and prosperous future for the Asia-Pacific region.

Mr. Benjamin Falk - What Roles Should Political, Military, and/or Corporate Leaders Assume With Regard to Managing PMSC Activities?

Mr. Benjamin Falk

Massey University
New Zealand

Bio

Ben Falk is an Officer Cadet from New Zealand. He has previous experience in the New Zealand Army, serving for 13 years with 2/1 Royal New Zealand Infantry Regiment. He has returned to study after a break, balancing work with distance study through Massey University. He is currently studying towards a Bachelor of Business majoring in Human Resource Management.

Ben credits his time in the Army with gaining many life experiences and making some good friends. He considers the highlight of his career leading soldiers overseas as a Section Commander in Iraq in 2016.

Abstract

Private military security companies (PMSCs) have been growing since the 1980s. However, there has been a dearth in legislation regulating them. This creates issues where their conduct is not in keeping with their employer’s intent as there is no process for holding them to account. An international solution might involve agreed definitions of a PMSC and their roles and responsibilities.

The current situation is problematic for three reasons. Firstly, although there is current legislation it is ineffective, being aimed more at individual mercenaries. Secondly, PMSCs have no code of conduct. This means there is no clear definition of what a PMSC is or what they can do. Third, it is anti-competitive, making it difficult for emerging companies to identify the market gap and tender their service.
Governments could develop legislation to clarify the legal definition of PMSCs. This would also enable the shared monitoring of PMSCs conduct. Such reporting would allow countries to recruit PMSCs based on their reputation creating a more competitive market space. Even PMSCs have identified the need for change signing up to voluntary international conventions as a means of self-regulation.

To leave the current situation around PMSCs as it is would be irresponsible. The industry is growing rapidly and will continue to do so. Left unchecked, its current state risks undermining future military operations. PMSCs operate in an industry worth billions of dollars with no clear legal framework meaning that regulation is now urgent.

Mr. Matias Diez LeCumberry - Leadership in Security Operations and Humanitarian Assistance

Mr. Matias Diez LeCumberry

Coleio Militar de la Nacion
Argentina

I was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina in March 1994. I lived in different places around the country because my father is an Army Officer. I am currently a 1st class cadet at the Colegio Militar de la Nación in El Palomar, Buenos Aires, Argentina. I’ll become an Army Officer along with a bachelor degree in Military Sciences very soon. I am the most senior cadet of the armored branch at the Colegio Militar that is the reason why I have the rank of “NCO Cadet”. I also have the Colegio Militar’s badges of honor and another one after the Equestrian Course I took in February 2018.

Call for Abstracts

Theme

What nations or other entities are using private military and security companies (PMSCs) for what purposes, and what are the leadership implications?

Submissions are Closed

We are no longer accepting abstracts.

Call for Papers, Panel Presentations and Poster Sessions

  • What are the applicable industry management systems, laws and ethical standards that apply to PMSC activities?
  • What roles should political, military, and/or corporate leaders assume with regard to managing PMSC activities? 
  • How do PMSCs influence the foreign policy objectives of nation-states?
  • How do PMSCs contribute to stability or increase the fragility of nation-states?
  • How should leaders plan for contractors as a key personnel component of the total U.S. military force?
  • What impacts on outsourcing security on state strength and world order should leaders consider?
  • U.S. Department of Defense management/interagency coordination of the operational contract support workforce.

Submission Guidelines

Milestones

2018

  • Deadline Extended to Sept. 15 - Close call for abstracts
  • Sept. 30 - Notify authors of abstracts accepted for symposium presentation

2019

  • Feb. 4 - Symposium articles due to the UNG Press
  • March 4 - Single blind peer review reports on submitted articles completed
  • March 18 - Author article revisions due
  • April 2 - Editorial approval of revisions completed
  • April 22 - Layout & design completed
  • April 29 - Proofing notes from and editors due
  • May 6 - Final proof due.
  • June 3 - Symposium Monograph release digitally and in print

Panel Submissions

Please submit abstracts (500 words) and short bio (150 words) by September 15, 2018 to Keith.Antonia@ung.edu, Sharon.Hamilton@ung.edu, or Eddie.Mienie@ung.edu. Panel presentations will be a maximum of 20 minutes in length. Participants will be notified of acceptance by September 30, 2018.

Poster Sessions

Undergraduate and graduate students and Cadets are invited to submit poster proposals (250 words) and short bio (150 words) by September 15, 2018 to Keith.Antonia@ung.edu, Sharon.Hamilton@ung.edu, or Eddie.Mienie@ung.edu. Bios should include Name, Phone, Email, University, Location, and Poster Title. Posters should be 36 inches x 48 inches in landscape or portrait layout orientation. Participants will be notified of acceptance by September 30, 2018.

Reading List
Recommended reading list for those interested in learning more about private military security companies.
Registration Info

Registration

Registration for the conference is free. Fill out the form below to register.

About the Area

The University of North Georgia is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Dahlonega, Georgia. Site of the first major gold rush in the United States, UNG is also home to the Army’s 5th Ranger Training Battalion, the mountain phase of the elite Ranger School.

Information about lodging and things to do is at the Dahlonega Chamber of Commerce website.

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