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Soldier-Leaders in the Age of AI: The Future of Pre-Commissioning Education

Symposium presented in partnership with the University of North Georgia Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies and the U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute

U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute logo

The theme of “adaptive, agile leaders” is pervasive in today’s military literature, yet the leader development impacts of accelerating technological change have been largely overlooked. In this context, institutions of higher education that produce military officers must understand the future operating environment and be equally agile and adaptive. The typical evolutionary approach to institutional change will not be successful. Today’s freshman cadets will be field-grade officers in 2035 with amazing opportunities and challenges that lie ahead of them.  Their success requires educational institutions and leader development programs fit for the age of artificial intelligence.

This symposium will explore:

  • How advances in science and technology will shape the future battlefield operating environment and support the future soldier-leader (e.g., neuroscience, cyber, man-machine learning, drones, augmented learning, artificial intelligence).
  • The influence of science and technology advances on future military leadership education and development (e.g. officer leader development in pre-commissioning education programs, recruiting).
  • The impact of artificial intelligence and technological initiatives on the ethical decision-making and ethical leadership of future soldier-leaders.

Date

November 13 - 14, 2019

Location

University of North Georgia
Dahlonega Campus
Convocation Center

Accessibility

If you need closed captioning for this event, please email Keith Antonia or call 706 867-4576.

Schedule

More Details to come

Wednesday, November 13

Time Event
7:45 a.m. Registration
8:15 a.m. Administrative Remarks - Keith Antonia, UNG Associate Vice President for Military Programs
8:20 a.m. Opening Remarks - Dr. Billy Wells, UNG Senior Vice President for Leadership & Global Engagement and Executive Director of the Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies 
8:30 a.m. Speaker: Chief Warrant Officer 3 Jerry Leverich, U.S. Army (Retired), U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command Director of Fusion and Assessments, on the Future Operational Environment
9:00 a.m. Q&A
9:15 a.m. Two Poster Session Summaries
9:20 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions
9:30 a.m. Speaker:  Major General Bob Scales, U.S. Army (Retired), Ph.D.
10:00 a.m. Q&A
10:15 a.m. Two Poster Session Summaries
10:20 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions
10:30 a.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: The Nature of Future Warfare
11:30 a.m. Q&A
11:45 p.m. Lunch
1:00 p.m. Speaker: Mr. Paul Scharre, Senior Fellow and Director, Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security 
1:30 p.m. Q & A 
1:45 p.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: The Future of Leader Development
3:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
3:15 p.m. Two Poster Session Summaries
3:20 p.m. Break
3:30 p.m. Speaker: Colonel Candice Frost, Director, Foreign Intelligence, U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G2 Intelligence 
4:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
4:15 p.m. Break - Poster Sessions
4:30 p.m. Speaker: Major General Mick Ryan, Commander of the Australian Defence College
5:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
5:15 p.m. Winning SciFi Story Reading
5:30 p.m. Break
6:30 p.m. Symposium Social at the Smith House
8:00 p.m. End of Day Activities

Thursday, November 14

Time Event
8:30 a.m. Registration
8:45 a.m. Administrative Remarks - Keith Antonia, UNG Associate Vice President for Military Programs 
8:50 a.m. Opening Remarks - Dr. Billy Wells, UNG Senior Vice President for Leadership & Global Engagement and Executive Director of the Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies Opening Remarks
9:00 a.m. Speaker: Major General Charles (Charlie) Dunlap, Jr., USFA (Ret.), Duke University Executive Director, Center on Law, Ethics and National Security
9:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
9:45 a.m. Two Poster Session Summaries
9:50 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions
10:00 a.m. Speaker: Emerson T. Brooking is a Resident Fellow at the Digital Forensic Research Lab of the Atlantic Council and coauthor of LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media
10:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
10:45 a.m. Break - Poster Sessions
11:00 a.m. Panel Discussion
Theme: Ethical Implications of AI on the Future Battlefield
12:00 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
12:15 p.m. Closing Remarks
12:30 p.m. End of Symposium
Speakers
major general bob scales

Major General Bob Scales, U.S. Army (Retired), Ph.D.

“The Future Land Battle: Multi-Domain Operations (MDO) or Army After Next (AAN)?”

Dr. Robert Scales served over thirty years in the Army, retiring as a Major General. Immediately after retirement from military service, he was appointed president and CEO of Walden University, one of the world’s largest private universities. More recently, he retired as CEO of Colgen Inc., a defense consultancy specializing in strategic leadership. He commanded two units in Vietnam, winning the Silver Star for action during the battles around Dong Ap Bia (Hamburger Hill) during the summer of 1969. Subsequently, he served in command and staff positions in the United States, Germany, Korea, and ended his military career as Commandant of the United States Army War College. In 1995 he created the Army After Next Program, which was the Army’s first attempt to build a strategic game and operational concept for future land warfare.

He has written and lectured on warfare and military history to academic, government, military, and business groups all over the world. He is the author of two books on military history: Certain Victory, the official account of the Army in the Gulf War and Firepower in Limited War, a history of the evolution of firepower doctrine since the end of the Korean War. In addition he is an authority on contemporary and future warfare. He has written three books on the theory of warfare: Future Warfare, a strategic anthology on America’s wars to come, Yellow Smoke: the Future of Land Warfare for America’s Military, and, most recently, Scales on War: the Future of America’s Military at Risk. He was the only serving officer to have written books subsequently selected for inclusion in the official reading lists of three services; Certain Victory for the Army, Firepower for the Marine Corps and Yellow Smoke for the Navy. Congressman Ike Skelton, former Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, has included Yellow Smoke in his National Security Book List sponsored by National Defense University. The New York Times, Atlantic and Foreign Affairs have reviewed his work, The Iraq War: a Military History, written with Williamson Murray very favorably. His work, U S Policy in Iraq and Afghanistan, published in 2012 and edited with Dr. Seyom Brown, anticipates today’s headlines with remarkable prescience.

He is a frequent consultant with the senior leadership of every service in the Department of Defense as well as Congress and many allied militaries. He has testified fifteen times before the Senate and House Armed Services Committees as well as the Foreign Relations and Environment and Public Works Committees of the Senate. He was honored to be the twentieth Nimitz Memorial Lecturer in 2004. In 2010 he was appointed as a member of the Congressional Quadrennial Defense Review.

He is an Adjunct Scholar with the Modern Military Institute at West Point. He has been senior military analyst for The BBC, National Public Radio, MSNBC and Fox News Network. He has written for and been frequently quoted in Foreign Affairs, The New York Times, The New York Post, The New York Daily News, The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Baltimore Sun, Time Magazine, National Review, National Interest, The Atlantic, Newsweek, Roll Call among many others. Scales latest work, Scales on War: America’s Military at Risk is a template for Secretary Mattis’ Close Combat Lethality Task Force.

The CCLTF is a DoD wide initiative to reform America’s Close Combat ground forces. Secretary Mattis has appointed Dr. Scales Chairman of the Advisory Board for this effort. He wears the Army’s Ranger Tab and Senior Parachutist’s Badge. He is a graduate of West Point and earned his PhD in history from Duke University.

COL FrostColonel Candice Frost, 
Director, Foreign Intelligence, U.S. Army Deputy Chief of Staff, G2 Intelligence

“Enhanced Current Warfighting Capabilities: Implications on Warfighting in the Future”

Colonel Candice E. Frost is the Director of Foreign Intelligence for the Army G-2 within the Headquarters, Department of the Army where she provides current and estimative intelligence to the Secretariat and the Army Staff and projects the Future Strategic Environment to the Secretary of the Army, Chief of Staff of the Army, Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, Army G-2, and Army Acquisition Executive. As the Director of Foreign Intelligence, Colonel Frost advises and provides foreign technical threat intelligence assessments in support of Army acquisition programs, science and technology efforts, and research and development programs.

Colonel Frost received her commission from the United States Military Academy at West Point, NY branching into Military Intelligence with the United States Army. Within the Army she has served at all levels of Military Intelligence from tactical, operational, to strategic levels of both analysis and command. Most recently, after her Battalion Command, she completed a War College Fellowship at the Central Intelligence Agency. Colonel Frost’s deployment experience includes Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan (2011), Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan (2005), and Stabilization Force XI, Bosnia (2002).

Colonel Frost’s military and civilian education are Airborne School, Military Intelligence Officer Basic Course, Military Intelligence Advanced Course, Combined Arms and Staff School, Signals Intelligence Tactical Operations Officer Course, Command and General Staff College, School of Advanced Military Studies, and the Senior Service College (Fellowship) Central Intelligence Agency. Colonel Frost holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Science from the United States Military Academy, a Master’s Degree in Public Administration from Central Michigan University, and a Master’s in Military Arts and Science from the School of Advanced Military Studies. She is an adjunct professor for the University of Arizona.

Colonel Frost’s awards and decorations include the Bronze Star Medal, Distinguished Meritorious Service Medal, Meritorious Service Medal (5 Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Commendation Medal (2 Oak Leaf Clusters), Army Achievement Medal, Meritorious Unit Citation, Armed Forces Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terror Expeditionary Medal, Global War on Terror Service Medal, Army Service Ribbon, Overseas Service Ribbon (Numeral 5), National Defense Service Medal (2), Combat Action Badge, and the Parachute Badge. She hails from Muscatine, Iowa and now lives in Washington D.C.

jerry-leverich-speaker-150x150.jpg

CW3 Jerry Leverich,
U.S. Army (Retired)

“The Future Operational Environment”

Jerry Leverich assumed his current duties as the Director of Fusion & Assessments Directorate for the G2 (Intelligence) of the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) in March 2019. He has served in multiple intelligence positions within the G2 following his retirement as a Chief Warrant Officer 3 (CW3) from the Army in February 2005. In his current capacity, he is responsible for providing intelligence and operational environment advice and considerations to a wide variety of analytic products for the TRADOC G-2 focused on defining the future operational environment. The directorate provides TRADOC and the Army with multi-disciplined intelligence assessments, briefings and reports required to facilitate training, leadership development, material acquisition and doctrine/concept development for the future U.S. Army.  Because of his extensive threat background, Leverich also served as a core member of the Army’s Russia New Generation Warfare study team.

A career intelligence officer, CW3 Leverich retired as a senior all-source intelligence warrant officer after over 22 years on active duty. He served in a wide variety of intelligence assignments culminating as the senior intelligence warrant officer to the US Army Pacific (USARPAC), G2 from 2002 to 2005.

During his military career, Leverich held key intelligence assignments from battalion to Corps; at the operational, joint and strategic level including assignments at the Defense Intelligence Agency, the Pentagon and among many embassies in Latin America. His overseas assignments include Korea, Germany and Hawaii. He served in Operations, Desert Shield/Desert Storm, Uphold Democracy, as part of US Army, Europe (FWD) in Taszar, Hungary, he supported the Implementation Force (IFOR) and Stability Force (SFOR) in Bosnia Herzegovina, and supported Operation Enduring Freedom -Philippines (OEF-P).   

Leverich graduated from Excelsior University in 2007 with a Bachelor of Arts. He earned a Master of Science from Redlands University in 2009. He is a graduate of the Advanced Course at the Army Management Staff College, and has received a Strategic Leadership post graduate certificate from the Darden Business School executive program at the University of Virginia. He is a mentor and graduate of TRADOC’s Senior Leader Development Program.

2019 symposium speaker, Paul Scharre

Paul Scharre,

Senior Fellow and Director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security

The Artificial Intelligence Revolution

Paul Scharre is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Technology and National Security Program at the Center for a New American Security. He is the award-winning author of Army of None: Autonomous Weapons and the Future of War, which won the 2019 Colby Award and was named one of Bill Gates’ top five books of 2018.

From 2008-2013, Mr. Scharre worked in the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) where he played a leading role in establishing policies on unmanned and autonomous systems and emerging weapons technologies. Mr. Scharre led the DoD working group that drafted DoD Directive 3000.09, establishing the Department’s policies on autonomy in weapon systems. Mr. Scharre also led DoD efforts to establish policies on intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) programs and directed energy technologies. Mr. Scharre was involved in the drafting of policy guidance in the 2012 Defense Strategic Guidance, 2010 Quadrennial Defense Review, and Secretary-level planning guidance. His most recent position was Special Assistant to the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy.

Prior to joining OSD, Mr. Scharre served as a special operations reconnaissance team leader in the Army’s 3rd Ranger Battalion and completed multiple tours to Iraq and Afghanistan. He is a graduate of the Army’s Airborne, Ranger, and Sniper Schools and Honor Graduate of the 75th Ranger Regiment’s Ranger Indoctrination Program.

Mr. Scharre has published articles in The New York TimesWall Street JournalCNNTIMEForeign PolicyForeign AffairsPolitico, and The National Interest, and has appeared on CNNMSNBCFox NewsNPR, and the BBC. He has testified before the House and Senate Armed Services Committees and has presented at the United Nations, NATO, the Pentagon, the CIA, and other national security venues. Mr. Scharre is a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations. He holds an M.A. in Political Economy and Public Policy and a B.S. in Physics, cum laude, both from Washington University in St. Louis.

major general mick ryan in uniformMajor General Mick Ryan, Commander of the Australian Defence College

“21st Century Accelerations: Why War, Strategy and People Will Never Be the Same Again”

Major General Mick Ryan graduated from the Royal Military College, Duntroon, in 1989 as a combat engineer. Career highlights prior to unit command include: in 2000, serving with the 6th Infantry Battalion Group, in east Timor; in 2003, being the lead planner for development of the first ADF Network Centric Warfare Roadmap; and in 2005, serving as the Deputy J3 for the Multi-National Security Transition Command – Iraq, in Baghdad.

Major General Ryan commanded the 1st Combat Engineer Regiment from January 2006 until December 2007, also commanding the 1st Reconstruction Task Force in southern Afghanistan from August 2006 to April 2007. He was awarded the Order of Australia for commanding the 1st Reconstruction Task Force. In 2008, he served on army Headquarters, working primarily on the Adaptive Army strategic reform initiative. In 2009, he was the Military Assistant to the Chief of Army.

From 2010 - 2011, Major General Ryan worked in the Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell on the US Joint Staff, as the Division Chief for Governance, Development and Engagement, and subsequently in a new Strategy and Policy Division. As part of his duties, he led the Joint Staff contribution for the President’s Afghanistan-Pakistan Annual Review for the National Security Committee in 2010 and led Pakistan Afghanistan Coordination Cell support to the confirmation of General John Allen in his Senate Confirmation for command in Afghanistan.

In January 2013, was appointed Director General Strategic Plans in Army Headquarters. During his time in this appointment, he was responsible for Army’s contribution to the Defence White Paper and Force Structure Review, design of the Army beyond 2020, Army experimentation, as well as fostering intellectual debate through the Army Journal and the establishment of the Land Power Forum internet blog.

Major General Ryan has a bachelor's degree in Asian Studies from the University of New England and is a graduate of the Australian Defence Force School of Languages. He is a distinguished graduate of the United States Marine Corps Command and Staff College, and a graduate of the USMC School of Advanced Warfighting. Most recently, in 2012, he graduated with distinction from the Johns Hopkins University, School of Advanced International Studies, with a master's in International Public Policy.

From October 2014 until February 2016, Major General Ryan commanded the 1st Brigade in Darwin, the Australian Army’s oldest and most operationally experienced combat formation. From February 2016 until October 2017, he led the education, training and doctrine efforts in Army as Director General Training and Doctrine. During this time he authored and implemented the Ryan Review, a fundamental and future-oriented strategic review of Army’s approach to education, training, doctrine and lessons learned.

Major General Ryan has a long-standing interest in military history and strategy, organizational innovation, complex adaptive systems and adaptation theory. He was inaugural President of the Defence Entrepreneurs Forum (Australia), an undertaking to nurture innovation in Army’s junior leaders, and is a proud Member of the Military Writers Guild. He is a keen writer on military, future technology and strategic issues and has published in Parameters, the Australian Army Journal, the ADF Journal, Security Challenges and a range of blogs.

He was appointed Commander of the Australian Defence College in January 2018.

Major General Charles (Charlie) Dunlap, Jr.Major General Charles (Charlie) Dunlap, Jr.,
USAF (Retired)

Charles J. Dunlap Jr., the former deputy judge advocate general of the United States Air Force, joined the Duke Law faculty in July 2010 where he is a professor of the practice of law and Executive Director of the Center on Law, Ethics and National Security. His teaching and scholarly writing focus on national security, international law, civil-military relations, cyberwar, airpower, counter-insurgency, military justice, and ethical issues related to the practice of national security law.

Dunlap retired from the Air Force in June 2010, having attained the rank of major general during a 34-year career in the Judge Advocate General Corps. In his capacity as deputy judge advocate general from May 2006 to March 2010, he assisted the judge advocate general in the professional supervision of more than 2,200 judge advocates, 350 civilian lawyers, 1,400 enlisted paralegals, and 500 civilians around the world. In addition to overseeing an array of military justice, operational, international, and civil law functions, he provided legal advice to the Air Staff and commanders at all levels.

In the course of his career, Dunlap has been involved in various high-profile interagency and policy matters, highlighted by his testimony before the U.S. House of Representatives concerning the Military Commissions Act of 2006.

Dunlap previously served as staff judge advocate at Headquarters Air Combat Command at Langley Air Force Base in Virginia and at Headquarters Air Education and Training Command at Randolph Air Force Base in Texas, among other leadership posts. His other assignments include the faculty of the Air Force Judge Advocate General School where he taught various civil and criminal law topics. An experienced trial lawyer, he also spent two years as a military trial judge for a 22-state circuit. He served tours in the United Kingdom and Korea, and he deployed for operations in the Middle East and Africa, including short stints in support of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq. He also led military-to-military delegations to Colombia, Uruguay, Iraq, and the Czech Republic.

A prolific author and accomplished public speaker, Dunlap’s commentary on a wide variety of national security topics has been published in leading newspapers and military journals. His 2001 essay written for Harvard University’s Carr Center on “lawfare,” a concept he defines as “the use or misuse of law as a substitute for traditional military means to accomplish an operational objective,” has been highly influential among military scholars and in the broader legal academy.

Dunlap’s legal scholarship also has been published in the Stanford Law Review, the Yale Journal of International Affairs, the Wake Forest Law Review, the Fletcher Forum of World Affairs, the University of Nebraska Law Review, the Texas Tech Law Review, and the Tennessee Law Review, among others. He is the author of “The Origins of the Military Coup of 2012”, originally published in 1992, which was selected for the 40th Anniversary Edition of Parameters (Winter 2010-2011). He is also the author of “Airpower” in Understanding Counterinsurgency (Thomas Rid and Thomas Keaney, eds., Routledge, 2010), and his essay on “The Military Industrial Complex” appeared in the Summer 2011 issue of Daedalus.

His article on international humanitarian law was published in 2012 in the German Red Cross in their Journal of International law of Peace and Armed Conflict, and he has a forthcoming essay ion the European Journal of International Law. His chapter on military law appeared in The Modern American Military (David Kennedy, ed., Oxford University Press, 2013), and his op-ed, “Bringing Bergdahl Home Was the Right Choice—Deserter or Not,” was published by Time Magazine (online) in March of 2015.  Additionally, his commentaries “To Ban New Weapons or Regulate Their Use?” and “Is it Really Better to be Dead Than Blind?” appeared on the Just Security blog in April of 2015.

Dunlap has written a number of articles on cyberwar including “Perspectives for Cyber Strategists on Law for Cyberwar” which appeared in the Spring 2011 issue of Strategic Studies Quarterly and his piece, “Some Reflections on the Intersection of Law and Ethics in Cyber War,” was published in the Jan-Feb 2013 issue of Air & Space Power Journal.   His essay, “The Hyper-Personalization of War: Cyber, Big Data, and the Changing Face of Conflict,” appeared in the fall 2014 issue of the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs.

His article, “Ethical Issues of the Practice of National Security Law,” was published by the Ohio Northern University Law Review in 2012, and re-published by the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Law & National Security for their annual conference in 2013. His chapter, “Clever or Clueless? Observations About Bombing Norm Debates,” appeared in The American Way of Bombing: Changing Ethical and Legal Norms, from Flying Fortresses to Drones (Matthew A. Evangelista and Henry Shue, eds., 2014).

Dunlap’s wife, Joy, was formerly a vice president of the National Association of Broadcasters, and most recently was the deputy director of Government Relations for the Military Officers Association of America. She is currently the president of the Duke Campus Club. They reside in Durham.

symposium speaker Emerson T. Brooking

Emerson T. Brooking

“Social Media has Transformed the Wars of Today. It will Revolutionize the Wars of Tomorrow.”

Emerson T. Brooking is a Resident Fellow at the Digital Forensic Research Lab of the Atlantic Council and coauthor of LikeWar: The Weaponization of Social Media. Most recently, he was Research Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations - the youngest researcher in a generation to receive such an appointment. He has served as an adviser on information warfare to the National Security Council, Joint Staff, and U.S. intelligence community, and his writing has been published in Foreign Affairs, WIRED, and Rolling Stone, among others. Brooking was recently named to the Forbes “30 Under 30.” He holds a BA in Political Science and Classical Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. 

Panels

Panel 1. Theme: The Nature of Future Warfare

Panelist

Prof Laviniu Bojor, Romanian Land Forces Academy - Topic: Preparing Military Leaders for Future Unpredictable Events

U.S. Navy Captain Michael Junge, U.S. Naval War College - Topic: What can the battle room, mobile infantry, and forever wars tell us how advances in science and technology might influence future military leadership education and development?

Captain Michael Junge Capt., U.S. Navy

Captain Michael Junge, USN is a Surface Warfare Officer and served afloat in USS MOOSBRUGGER (DD 980), USS UNDERWOOD (FFG 36), USS WASP (LHD 1), USS THE SULLIVANS (DDG 68) and was the 14th Commanding Officer of USS WHIDBEY ISLAND (LSD 41). Ashore he served with Navy Recruiting; Assault Craft Unit FOUR; Deputy Commandant for Programs and Resources, Headquarters, Marine Corps; Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Communication Networks (N6); and with the Office of the Secretary of Defense. He has written extensively with articles appearing in the United States Naval Institute Proceedings magazine, US Naval War College’s Luce.nt, and on the blog “Information Dissemination”.

Dr. Bryson Payne & Dr. Tamirat Abegaz, UNG - Topic: Augmented Situational Awareness: Drones, Heads-up Displays, and Real-time Cyber Intelligence

Dr. Bryson Payne Director, Center for Cyber Operations Education, Tenured Professor

Dr. Bryson Payne is a TEDx speaker, best-selling author, and the founding Director of the Center for Cyber Operations Education at the University of North Georgia, an NSA Center for Academic Excellence in Cyber Defense. He is a tenured professor of computer science at UNG, where he has taught aspiring coders and cyber professionals since 1998. He is a Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP®) and Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), and he holds the elite SANS|GIAC GPEN certification, among other industry certifications. He was also the first Department Head of Computer Science at UNG and enjoys working with K-12 schools worldwide to promote computer science education.

Featured in CIO magazine, Campus Technology, and the Wall Street Journal, Dr. Payne is the best-selling author of Teach Your Kids to Code: A Parent-Friendly Guide to Python Programming (2015, No Starch Press), now published in six languages (Russian, Chinese, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, and English), Learn Java the Easy Way (2017, No Starch Press), and Hacking for Kids (2019, No Starch Press). He’s a popular online instructor with over 30,000 students from more than 160 countries, known for his top-rated Udemy course, Real-World Ethical Hacking (2017).

He holds a Ph.D. in computer science from Georgia State University and has published articles in scholarly and trade journals, in addition to speaking regularly at national and international conferences on computer science and cybersecurity education.

Dr. Tamirat Abegaz Assistant Professor, Computer Science

Dr. Tamirat Abegaz brings a wealth of experience in user experience to the University of North Georgia (UNG). Prior to joining UNG, Abegaz served in a variety of web development roles in Ethiopia including senior web developer for Africa Union, and as project manager for Commercial and National Bank of Ethiopia.

Tamirat Abegaz received his PhD from Clemson University in 2014 under the supervision of Juan Gilbert. As a researcher, he has explored and developed non-traditional and emergent methods of user interactions, which include the use of multi-modal interfaces, emotional design elements, and modeling of various culturally fitted personas using psychological and human factors principles. His Ph.D. work revolves around emotional designs to improve web search experience for older adults. His research interests include but not limited to: digital forensics, cybersecurity education, user experience (UX) design, development, and evaluation, genetic engineering, and biometric systems, . He is GIAC Certified Forensics Analyst (GCFA), GIAC Certified Incident Handler (GCIH), Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Security+, Microsoft Certified Professional (MCP), Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS), and a Certified Scum Master (SCM). He has successfully published a number of articles in cybersecurity and related fields. He has several other publication and research projects currently active and in progress. He is an active reviewer of conference papers and journal articles.

Dr. Ash Mady & Dr. Bethany Niese, UNG - Topic: How far can we go: The role of AI in soldier-leader development

Dr. Ash Mady Department Head - Computer Science & Information Systems

Ash Mady holds a Ph.D. in business administration with a research focus in information security from Kennesaw State University. Mady also earned a Master of Science in Information Systems, Bachelor of Science in Computer Science, and a Bachelor of Science in Chemistry and Physics.

Ash Mady has over twenty years of experience in management and software engineering. Currently, Mady serves as department head of Computer Science and Information Systems in the Mike Cottrell College of Business at the University of North Georgia. He teaches a variety of computer science and computer information systems courses including Application Development, Mobile Development, Systems Analysis and Design, and Information Management, among others. Prior to re-joining UNG in 2015, Mady served as a technical account manager for Red Hat, Inc. where he led and coordinated the efforts performed by Red Hat technical resources on selected global initiatives to engineer solutions and establish standards that align strategic clients’ priorities with Red Hat resources. Mady previously worked at UNG (formerly known as North Georgia College and State University) for 16 years in various IT-related roles with his last position serving as associate CIO for IT engineering leading the efforts for process automation, software engineering, information systems architecture, design, and implementation.

Moderator

Dr. Dan Papp

Dr. Daniel S. Papp Consultant, Pendleton Group & Scholar of International Affairs and Policy, Former President of Kennesaw State University

Dr. Daniel S. Papp retired as President of Kennesaw State University (KSU) in 2016.  Since his retirement, he has served as President of Papp Consulting LLC.

During his 10 years as president, Papp led the consolidation of KSU and Southern Polytechnic State, making KSU one of the 50 largest U.S. universities; initiated its first doctoral programs; led KSU’s first capital campaign; added over $500 million of facilities; guided KSU into NCAA Division I athletics including intercollegiate football; expanded KSU’s external funded research; and doubled KSU’s study abroad program, including opening KSU’s first international campus.

Before becoming KSU President, Papp was Senior Vice Chancellor for Academics and Fiscal Affairs of the University System of Georgia (USG); Interim President of Southern Polytechnic; Executive Assistant to the President of Georgia Tech; Founding Director of Tech’s Sam Nunn School of International Affairs; and Director of Tech’s School of Social Sciences.

Papp has been Senior Research Scholar at both the Center for Aerospace Doctrine of the Air War College and the Strategic Studies Institute of the Army War College.  The Army twice awarded him the “Outstanding Civilian Service” medal.  He also has been Visiting Professor at Western Australia Institute of Technology in Perth; Visiting Professor at Fudan University in Shanghai; and led study abroad programs to the Soviet Union, France, Germany, and Italy.   

A Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Dartmouth College, Dr. Papp earned his Ph.D. in International Affairs from the University of Miami.  He is the author, co-author, or editor of 14 books and over 80 articles on U.S. and Soviet/Russian foreign policy and international relations, including former Secretary of State Dean Rusk’s autobiography, As I Saw It.

Panel 2. Theme: The Future of Leader Development

Panelist

Colonel Jim Soloman, U.S. Army (Retired) - Topic: Leading Humans in the Age of AI - Why We Need Integrator Leaders

Colonel Jim Solomon, U.S. Army (Retired) CEO & Co-Founder of Chambers Bay Institute

Following his leader development studies at the University of North Georgia, Jim was commissioned and advanced in his Army career to the rank of Colonel with global responsibilities. He then went on to hold numerous leadership positions within Fortune 500 corporations, privately owned companies, and entrepreneurial startups. His spirit of service attracted him to volunteer on various non-profit boards where he has served as committee chairs and Chairman of one of the largest senior living communities in the state of Texas.

As a leadership coach, consultant, and author, Jim continues to demonstrate his commitment to developing capable leaders for future generations. Jim’s leadership philosophy is simple – it’s all about WE, not ME.

COL Tina Hartley & Dr. Rebecca Jones-Kellogg, U.S. Military Academy - Topic: Educating Army Leaders for a Changing World

Captain Josh Bowen, U.S. Military Academy - Topic: Regardless of Changing Technology and Operating Environments: Deliberate Leader Development and Key Leader Qualities Endure Into 2035

Major Joe Byerly from The Green Book - Topic: Giving Cadets and Officers a Competitive Advantage in Life – Through a Dedicated Investment in Their Own Leader Development

Major Joe Byerly
Major Joe Byerly Founder of From The Green Notebook

Joe Byerly is an Armor Officer and recently served as a special advisor within the U.S. Special Operations Command. He received his bachelor’s degree from the University of North Georgia and his master’s degree from the U.S. Naval War College. He is a non-resident fellow at the Modern War Institute at West Point and the founder of From the Green Notebook, a website emphasizing military leadership and professional development. His writings have been published in War on the Rocks, Army magazine, Strategy Bridge, and Small Wars Journal.

Cadet Jihyeon Kwak, Korea Military Academy - Topic: A Preliminary Study of Utilizing AI Interviews to Select Korean Military Academy Cadets

Cadet Jihyeon Kwak Senior Cadet at the Korea Military Academy

Moderator

Colonel Jim Soloman, U.S. Army (Retired)

Colonel Jim Solomon, U.S. Army (Retired) CEO & Co-Founder of Chambers Bay Institute

Following his leader development studies at the University of North Georgia, Jim was commissioned and advanced in his Army career to the rank of Colonel with global responsibilities. He then went on to hold numerous leadership positions within Fortune 500 corporations, privately owned companies, and entrepreneurial startups. His spirit of service attracted him to volunteer on various non-profit boards where he has served as committee chairs and Chairman of one of the largest senior living communities in the state of Texas.

As a leadership coach, consultant, and author, Jim continues to demonstrate his commitment to developing capable leaders for future generations. Jim’s leadership philosophy is simple – it’s all about WE, not ME.

Panel 3. Theme: Ethical Implications of AI on the Future Battlefield

Panelist

Jacob Scott - Topic: Iron Triangle of Painful Tradeoffs” and Responsible Decision-making with Respect to Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS)

Colonel Tony Pfaff, Ph.D., U.S. Army (Retired) - Topic: The Ethics of Acquiring Disruptive Technology

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff Strategy, the Military Profession and Ethic at the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI), U.S. Army War College

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff is the Research Professor for the Military Profession and Ethic at the U.S. Army War Colleges Strategic Studies Institute. A retired Army colonel, Dr. Pfaff recently served as Director for Iraq on the National Security Council Staff. While on active duty, he served on the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department, as the Defense Attaché in Baghdad, the Chief of International Military Affairs for US Army Central Command, and as the Defense Attaché in Kuwait. He served twice in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, once as the Deputy J2 for a Joint Special Operations Task Force and as the Senior Military Advisor for the Civilian Police Assistance Training Team. He also served as the Senior Intelligence Officer on the Iraq Intelligence Task Force and as a UN observer along the Iraq-Kuwait border. Dr. Pfaff has a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Economics from Washington and Lee University, a master’s degree in Philosophy from Stanford University; a master’s in National Resource Management from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces; and a Doctorate in Philosophy from Georgetown University.

Moderator

Colonel Tony Pfaff, Ph.D., U.S. Army (Retired), Army War College Strategic Studies Institute

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff Strategy, the Military Profession and Ethic at the Strategic Studies Institute (SSI), U.S. Army War College

Dr. C. Anthony Pfaff is the Research Professor for the Military Profession and Ethic at the U.S. Army War Colleges Strategic Studies Institute. A retired Army colonel, Dr. Pfaff recently served as Director for Iraq on the National Security Council Staff. While on active duty, he served on the Policy Planning Staff at the State Department, as the Defense Attaché in Baghdad, the Chief of International Military Affairs for US Army Central Command, and as the Defense Attaché in Kuwait. He served twice in Operation IRAQI FREEDOM, once as the Deputy J2 for a Joint Special Operations Task Force and as the Senior Military Advisor for the Civilian Police Assistance Training Team. He also served as the Senior Intelligence Officer on the Iraq Intelligence Task Force and as a UN observer along the Iraq-Kuwait border. Dr. Pfaff has a bachelor’s degree in Philosophy and Economics from Washington and Lee University, a master’s degree in Philosophy from Stanford University; a master’s in National Resource Management from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces; and a Doctorate in Philosophy from Georgetown University.

Posters

Cadet Jihyeon Kwak - A Preliminary Study of AI Interview's Usefulness in Selecting Korean Military Academy Cadets

Cadet Jihyeon Kwak Senior Cadet at the Korea Military Academy
Submit a Paper or Poster

We are no longer accepting abstracts.

The symposium review committee will select the most relevant and highest-quality submissions for nine to twelve scholars to present and discuss. Undergraduate submissions will be considered for poster sessions. Authors of selected abstracts will be invited to present as members of panels during the symposium. Extended papers from selected abstracts will be published by the University of North Georgia Press in a peer-reviewed, edited print, and digital conference proceedings. Please email any questions to ungp@ung.edu using ILSS Symposium in the subject line.

Possible topics may include:

  • How advances in science and technology will shape the future battlefield operating environment and how (e.g., bioscience, neuroscience, embedded technology, man-machine learning, augmented learning, artificial intelligence).
  • How advances in science and technology contribute to the physical, cognitive and emotional development of the soldier-leader on a battlefield in 2035 (e.g., enhanced resilience, psychological considerations, health and fitness).
  • The impact of future initiatives from the U.S. Army and other international ground forces on adaptive leadership alongside ethical decision-making (e.g., officer leader development in pre-commissioning education programs).

Panel Submissions

Please submit panel abstracts (500 words) and short bio (150 words) by September 15, 2019 to UNG digital commons. Please submit only abstracts (not complete articles) and bios; this link will accept abstracts and bios. Panel presentations will be a maximum of 20 minutes in length. Participants will be notified of acceptance by September 30, 2019.

Poster Sessions

Undergraduate, graduate students and cadets are invited to submit poster proposals (250 words) and short bio (150 words) by September 30, 2019 to UNG digital commons. Please submit only poster proposals (not posters) and bios. Bios should include name, phone, email, university, location, and poster title. Posters should be 36 x 48 (inches) in landscape or portrait. Participants will be notified of acceptance.

Guidelines for Poster Presentation (PDF)

Helpful Resources for Preparing your Poster

The following resources may be helpful to you as you prepare your submission:

How to Prepare a Research Poster

Giving an Effective Poster Presentation

Sci FI Story Contest

Submissions are Closed

2019 Military Science Fiction Story Contest

“When corpses of nanobots turn your blood to sludge, the only weapon you have is a crushed plasma launcher turned $75,000 paperweight, and your exoskeleton becomes nothing more than a cold tin can cocoon, you are going to wish you had remembered to activate that EMP shield.  Don’t forget your pre-combat checks!” 

The University of North Georgia’s Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies (ILSS), in conjunction with ILSS’s annual symposium, is holding a Military Science Fiction story contest. The contest theme ties with this year’s symposium theme: the Soldier of the Future. The contest focus is on junior leadership/preparing junior leaders/pre-commissioning education, with a Ranger lieutenant taking a central role. Preference will be given to submissions from current or past members of the Department of Defense (military and civilian) and the Intelligence Community.

Submissions are open from May 15 to October 15, 2019

Awards

  • Grand Prize winner receives $500 cash prize
  • Three runners-up $100 cash prize
  • Publication in UNG Press ILSS Symposium Monograph and one print copy

Thematic Guidelines:

  • Authors may use Special Operations Forces (SOF) of 20 years hence as the context, but Rangers are preferred over other “SOF Species.”
    • Rogers’ Rangers, established in 1751, is the longest historical connection our military has with any type of military organization (save the Militia, now the Guard). Keeping this historical continuity with the American Ranger in mind, submitted stories should keep one foot in reality and the other deep into the future.
  • Stories should focus on a lieutenant infantry/combat unit platoon leader and their experiences. At minimum, the “platoon” needs to be mixed gender, like in Starship Troopers.

All reasonable future developments technical, political, and cultural may be considered such as:

  • Possible modifications to Chain of Command resulting from technological changes
    • AI-assisted implants or wearables that can assess the immediate tactical situation and reassign ranks/responsibilities in real time
    • Soldiers reporting to foreign nationals who may have different ethics, values, and/or and equipment
    • AI-based VR simulations that run through thousands of possible scenarios in a tactical situation in microseconds, using all digital resources, and then recommend a few for the soldier to think about
    • Co-bots or companion bots that fight in front of or alongside humans, and the situations that arise from that, such as
      • Is the target value worth the cost/skills of destroying the co-bot?
      • Do co-bots answer to only one solder, or can they be overridden by higher command for any reason
  • Real-time Rules of Engagement
    • In fighting adversaries with zero limitations, can a human direct a co-bot to switch to, say, Al Qaeda norms, or PRC, or Russian?
    • Can weapons deployment be overridden by higher command? The consequences?
  • A strong interest in the individual soldier and their leader as technology and modifications are made available to the regular Soldier
  • In addition to considering positive benefits of technologies, stories may weave in context from a previous experience where tech failures—like nanobots, exoskeletons, EMP, and viruses—left Soldiers helpless. Historical examples include:
    • The Battle of Kasserine Pass
    • The Battle of Cannae
    • Task Force Faith
  • Stories may use the new “Space Force” as a backdrop
  • For a different political and economic backdrop, stories may pose a “United States of the Americas” as a now-unified continental group by 2035+, but in great competition with an equally consolidated Asia (with exceptions) both in competition over Sub-Saharan African resources 
  • Disruptive thought or ideas are welcomed. Think new tactics, new ROE, new and different adversaries and their tactics/technologies—and/or the disruptive elements of all of these.

Submission Rules

  • Submit one manuscript per author to ungpress@ung.edu
  • Subject line must read “Science Fiction Contest Submission”
  • Open to all writers (inside and outside the U.S.)
  • Must be fiction 
  • Must be original and unpublished (authors retain sole rights to any works submitted)
  • Must be 4,000 words or less
  • Must use acceptable file types: doc, dox, rtf, pdf.
  • Must use 8.5x11 page size, double-spaced throughout with 1-inch margins on top and bottom/1.25-inch margins on left and right sides
  • Must use Arial, Courier, or Times font, 12 point font size
  • Must be in the English language
  • Winners and runners-up will allow the UNG Press first publication rights, after which rights will revert back to the authors
  • Entries that promote hatred of any given race, religion, sex, or ethnicity will be disqualified.

Note: UNG Press/ILSS cannot be held responsible for any failure of the delivery of entries due to any electronic or internet outage issues. By entering this contest, you agree that you have read, understand, and agree that contest judging is subjective and that you agree to accept and abide by the decision making of the judges in the scoring and judging of the fiction you enter. By submitting your fiction, you agree to indemnify, defend, and hold harmless UNG/ILSS selected officers, judges, instructors, and staff associated with this contest.

Reading List
Recommended reading list for those interested in learning more about future scenarios and predictions.
Registration Info

Registration

Lodging

Symposium panelists and speakers should contact Melissa Grizzle at 706 867-3230 or e-mail Melissa.grizzle@ung.edu to arrange for lodging.

All other attendees should reserve lodging on their own. Lodging suggestions may be found on the Dahlonega Chamber of Commerce web site.

Meals

Meals will not be provided. A social with heavy hors d’oeuvres is provided free for attendees the evening of 13 November.  Visit the Chamber of Commerce web site for local restaurants which are a 15 minute walk from the Convocation Center. A shuttle van will also be available. Meals may also be taken in the UNG dining facility which is a five-minute walk from the Convocation Center. 

Dress

Business or business casual.

Parking

Parking is in front of the Convocation Center in Lot 62 (L52) in spaces marked by orange traffic cones; in the red parking area between L52 and the front of the Convocation Center; or across Morrison Moore Parkway in Lot 62 (L62).

Disclaimer: The U.S. Army War College Strategic Studies Institute partnership does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Department of Defense, the Department of the Army or the Army War College.

UNG follows Section 508 Standards and WCAG 2.0 for web accessibility. If you require the content on this web page in another format, please contact the ADA Coordinator.
Use of military-themed imagery does not constitute endorsement by the U.S. Department of Defense.

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