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Civil-Military Symposium

Symposium on “Civil-Military Cooperation and International Collaboration in Cyber Operations”

The University of North Georgia Institute for Leadership and Strategic Studies, in collaboration with the Center for Cyber Operations Education and the College of Arts and Letters, invites academics, graduate and undergraduate students, international cadets from foreign military academies, and cadets from U.S. service academies and other senior military colleges, to present papers or posters addressing this topic at the second annual UNG Security Symposium. Through this symposium, UNG and the ILSS intend to contribute to the scholarly discussion of security and strategic issues in this increasingly complex domain.

Date

November 7-9, 2017

Location

UNG Dahlonega Campus
(Dining Facility Banquet Room)

Overview

Many of the major threats to U.S. national security are occurring in the cyber domain. In a 2015 Department of Defense article, the former U.S. Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, General Martin Dempsey, noted that civilian infrastructure and businesses “present a significant vulnerability to our nation.” Some of the threats include adversaries that constantly seek “to infiltrate networks and degrade capabilities, disrupt operations, or steal information.” He added that “In cyber, we have competitors, and we have competitors who maybe aren’t as constrained by legal systems and freedoms as we are.”

However, the question of what entity has ultimate responsibility for defending U.S. interests in the cyber domain remains unanswered. The mission of the Department of Defense is to provide military forces needed to deter war and to protect the security of our country. The U.S Department of Homeland Security ensures a homeland that is safe, secure, and resilient against terrorism and other hazards. What is the role of the U.S. Department of State, and how does the U.S. plan to partner with foreign nations? To what extent are other entities, government or commercial, responsible? What is U.S. policy regarding this issue, and is it adequate to the task, now and in the future?  

Speakers

Major General Stephen G. Fogarty

Chief of Staff of the U.S. Cyber Command

A native of Georgia, MG Fogarty entered active duty as a Military Intelligence (MI) Corps Second Lieutenant in 1983, upon graduation from North Georgia College. His recent assignments include Commanding General, U.S. Army Cyber Center of Excellence and Fort Gordon; Commanding General, Intelligence and Security Command (INSCOM); Deputy Chief of Staff, Intelligence, CJ-2, International Security Assistance Force, Operation Enduring Freedom; Director of Intelligence, J-2, U.S. Central Command; and Director, Joint Intelligence Operations Center, Operation Enduring Freedom.

MG Fogarty served in command assignments as Commander, Long Range Surveillance Detachment, 125th MI Battalion, 25th Infantry Division (Light), Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; Commander, 732d MI Battalion, 115th MI Group, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii; and Commander, 116th MI Brigade, Fort Gordon, Georgia.

MG Fogarty has held key staff assignments as S2, 2/327th Infantry Regiment, Fort Campbell, Kentucky, S-2, 2d Battalion, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Lewis, Washington, and Operation Just Cause; Chief, Analysis and Control Element, G-2, later S-3 (Operations), 311th MI Battalion, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky; S-2, 75th Ranger Regiment, Fort Benning, Georgia; G-2, 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), Fort Campbell, Kentucky; and Chief, Integrated Survey Program, U.S. Special Operations Command, MacDill Air Force Base, Florida and Operation Enduring Freedom, Afghanistan.

MG Fogarty holds a bachelor of arts degree in history from North Georgia College (now University of North Georgia). He is a graduate of the U.S. Army War College with a master's of science degree in strategic studies. He also holds a master's of science degree in administration from Central Michigan University. His military education also includes the MI Officer Basic and Advanced Courses and the U.S. Army Command and General Staff College.

Presenters
Scholars are invited to submit abstracts for papers or posters before August 2, 2017. Abstracts will be evaluated by a UNG review committee and selections will be announced by August 16, 2017. (See the Call for Abstracts tab for more detail.)
Discussion Forum

In order to help facilitate discussion before, during and after the symposium, we will create a discussion forum here.  Please check back as we get closer to the symposium.

Accessibility
If you need closed captioning for this event, please email Keith Antonia or call 706 867-4576 before October 28.
Schedule
Date Time Event
Nov. 7 (Tuesday) 6:00 p.m. Dinner with Presenters
Nov. 8 (Wednesday) 8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast for all
8:45 a.m. Welcome, administrative remarks and introduce guests and presenters
9:00 a.m. Speaker (topic TBD)
9:30 a.m. Panel Discussion (3-4 panelists) - theme TBD
10:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
10:45 a.m. Break
11:00 a.m. Small group discussions and develop 2-minute presentations
11:30 a.m. Small groups give 2-minute presentations
12:00 p.m. Lunch
12:30 p.m. Keynote Speaker (During Lunch)
1:15 p.m. Break
1:30 p.m. Panel discussion (3-4 panelists) - theme TBD
2:30 p.m. Discussion and Q&A
2:45 p.m. Break - Poster Sessions
3:00 p.m. Small group discussions and develop 2-minute presentations
3:30 p.m. Small groups give 2-minute presentations
4:00 p.m. Break
4:15 p.m. Speaker (topic TBD)
5:00 p.m. Day 1 Concludes
6:30 p.m. Symposium Social and Poster Session - Heavy Hors D'Odeuvres
8:00 p.m. End Social
Nov. 9 (Thursday) 8:00 a.m. Continental breakfast for all - Poster Sessions
8:45 a.m. Welcome, administrative remarks and intruduce guests and presenters
9:00 a.m. Speaker (topic TBD)
9:30 a.m. Panel Discussion (3-4 panelists) - theme TBD
10:30 a.m. Discussion and Q&A
10:45 a.m. Break - Poster Session
11:00 a.m. Small group discussions and develop 2-minute presentations
11:30 a.m. Small groups give 2-minute presentations
12:00 p.m. Lunch
12:30 p.m. Keynote Speaker (During Lunch)
1:15 p.m. Closing Remarks
1:30 p.m. End of Conference
Call for Abstracts

We invite scholars to submit abstracts for papers or posters on topics related to Civil-Military Cooperation and International Collaboration in Cyber Operations. Possible topics include:

  • Identify the entity that has ultimate responsibility for defending U.S. interests in the cyber domain. Is it the U.S. Department of Defense, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, or other entity, government or commercial?
  • The extent to which the U.S. military should collaborate through training and education with military allies, U.S. government, and private entities in cyber operations.    
  • Determine U.S. policy related to U.S. national security in the cyber domain, including the role of the U.S. Department of State and partnering with foreign nations. Is U.S. policy adequate to the task now and in the future? 
  • Define and identify examples of “hostile acts” or “acts of war” involving engagements in cyberspace. Are cyber engagements acts of war when there is no imminent threat to human life? Are cyber-physical attacks (cyber-based attacks with kinetic effects, like shutting down a power grid, sabotaging traffic lights in a busy city, shutting down hospital systems, opening a dam) that threaten human life considered acts of war? How does the right to self-defense change in cyberspace?
  • The application of the Just War Theory to acts of cyber aggression and cyber espionage. 
  • Attribution (determining who launched an attack) in cyber. How certain must a nation be that an attack came from a particular source before taking retaliatory action? Do cyber attacks from a rogue entity inside a sovereign state justify the use of force (cyber and/or kinetic) against that state?
  • Cyber attacks against U.S. and allied economic interests. Do massive cyber attacks against private sector entities constitute acts of war? What civil-military response/use of force is appropriate to protect the economic security interests of the U.S. and our allies?   

Extended papers from selected abstracts will be published by the University of North Georgia Press in a peer-reviewed and edited Symposium Monograph.

The November 7-9, 2017 Symposium will consist of

  • Panel Presentations (15-20 minute individual papers),
  • Roundtable discussions/Q&A sessions, and
  • Poster Sessions

Submission Guidelines

For Panel Sessions: Please submit abstracts (500 words) and short bio (150 words) by Aug 2, 2017 to christopher.jespersen@ung.edu and Bryson.payne@ung.edu OR keith.antonia@ung.edu and bj.robinson@ung.edu. Papers will be a maximum 20 minutes in length. Participants will be notified of acceptance by Aug 16, 2017

For Poster Sessions: Undergraduate and graduate students and cadets are invited to submit poster proposals (250 words) and short bio (150 words) by Aug 2, 2017 to [see above]. Bios should include Name, Phone, Email, University, Location, and Poster Title. Posters should be 36 inches x 48 inches in landscape or portrait layout orientation. Participants will be notified of acceptance by Aug 16, 2017

Aug. 2 Close call for abstracts
Aug. 16 Notify authors of abstracts accepted for publication and symposium presentation
Nov. 7 Dinner for speakers, presenters and symposium papers due to the UNG Press
Nov. 8-9 Symposium
2018
Jan. 31 Presenters: Symposium papers due to the UNG Press
Feb. 28 Presenters: Organizing Group editors' single blind peer review reports on completed papers due
March 15 Presenters: Author revisions of papers due
March 30 Presenters: Editorial approval of revisions due
April 16 Presenters: Layout and design due
April 23 Presenters: Proofing notes from authors and editors due
April 30 Presenters:  Final proof due. Send to LS for printing.
May 23 Presenters: Symposium Monograph release digitally and in print
Other Info

The University of North Georgia is located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains in Dahlonega, Georgia. Site of the first major gold rush in the United States, UNG is also home to the Army’s 5th Ranger Training Battalion, the mountain phase of the elite Ranger School.

Information about lodging and things to do is at the Dahlonega Chamber of Commerce website.

historic downtown dahlonega square
UNG dahlonega campus at dusk with mountains in background
historic shopping in old houses in historic downtown dahlonega

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