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Student Voices from the Quarantine Exhibition

UNG Visual Arts students, like so many across our country, in March went from going to classes and meeting up with friends to being isolated in their apartments and homes in quarantine. Everyone processes sudden changes in their own way; however, artists have a special method for expressing themselves. They turn to creativity.

The UNG Art Galleries are excited to share our first online exhibition: Student Voices from the Quarantine. These works were all created by Department of Visual Arts students during this time of isolation; some used art to reflect their mood, others reflected on life outside of the quarantine. Each art work represents the wide range of reactions of these UNG students to this remarkable time.

Neona Brackett

Fortuna Loquitur
Clay and mixed media
art piece of clay fortune cookie
art piece of clay fortune cookies

Magnum Brock

Mindchaser
Acrylic on Canvas

magnu brock acrylic painting mindchaser

Paul Brock

Hope
Pencil, micron and watercolor on paper

watercolor of bunny

Halle Castille

Pop Heart
Found objects

heat-shaped piece made from found objects

Angelica Cummings

Giant Bunny on a Magical Island
Mixed medium

I was inspired by my pet bunny, Cocoa, and my favorite genre, fantasy. He's sitting around a bunch of flowers in a forest of red and blue trees. It reminds me of Alice in Wonderland!

artwork of bunny in flowers

Natalie Davenport

Back to Nature
Ceramic Greenware

Back to nature is a group of three greenware wheel thrown pieces. It’s inspiration stems from Natalie’s time during quarantine during the Covid-19 outbreak. Natalie spent much of her outside studio time either in the kitchen, or out in nature, thus leading to her work back to nature.  Due to lack of resources, pieces are neither bisque nor glaze fired. 

three different ceramic greenware

Cassady Fulbright

Zoom
Acrylic on canvas

These are the my classmates in film photography. Through Zoom, you glimpse into your peer's worlds. We are all living our own little individual lives, surviving, doing what it takes to make it each day. Each screen is a portal into a different place with its own personal style. We are all so different, and live so differently. Our lives look a lot different than they did a month ago. Zoom is a place that brings us all together when we are really so far apart.  

painting of four people in blocks like a zoom meeting

 

Katrina Henrickson

Finding Color in the Darkness
Oil on canvas

oil painting with mixes of color

Donal Jolley

Covid
Acrylic

Jolley painted this as the weight of his own upended life was compounded by those of his wife, an RN in the Atlanta region, and his daughter and son-in-law, both ICU doctors in New York City. His daughter was diagnosed with Covid-19 but had to return to work in the second week of her illness due to the crushing patient load and lack of physicians in the hard-hit New York City hospital districts.

acrylic painting titled covid

Joshua Loftin

Daybreak
Digital painting

This piece is about the wane of this whole pandemic. We are coming to exit of the forest as the sun begins to rise.

painting of a man in the wooded area with a lamp

Lori Marshall

Youth of the Quarantine 2020
Charcoal on paper

This is my son playing the Nintendo Switch. While on quarantine, he prefers to immerse himself into video games which I'm sure a lot of the youth is concurrently doing. More than ever, I feel that we are all connected electronically through many platforms to stay engaged with one another. While he is immersed, I wanted the viewer to feel immersed as well. 

charcoal drawing of young male playing nintendo switch

Jonah McEver

Blindsided
Acrylic on canvas

In addition to attending UNG as a full-time art student, I also work full-time in the office of a grocery store. "Blindsided" is my interpretation of the current social dilemma of panic buying at grocery stores as well as the lengths at which some are going to avoid illness.

acrylic painting of person in hazmat suit shopping for groceries

Melissa Poloncarz

6ft a-p-a-r-t
Digital photograph

This self-portrait represents all of the anxiety and questions that circled through my mind as I transitioned from an active life to my isolated online life. I became overwhelmed. I have learned it is okay to hit pause and reset.

photograph of female in n95 mask with painted text surrounding her

Rebecca Sabaka

I have come so that they may have life
Acrylic on black matte canvas

COVID-19 took summer camp and being a fourth year counselor away from me. Even so, I can hold fast onto the fact that I am a daughter to a God that gives life over and over again. His promises don’t dissipate regardless of my circumstances. There is something greater than camp or my own plans that he hasn’t revealed yet. This painting is a permanent reminder of that truth.

acrylic painting by Rebecca Sabaka

Rachel Spangler

Beck
Mixed Media

mixed media piece of a face

Rebecca Swain

Weaving at Home
Assorted wool and cotton yarns

weaving piece 1
weaving piece 2
swain-rebecca-3.jpg

Mallie Sykes

Bonnaroo
2015/2020, Watercolor and xerox transfer

image of two males at music festival

Kristina Thompson

The End of Us
Acrylic paint and mixed media

painting of plants overtaking skyscapers

Charles Wharton

The Inflation Vortex
Designed in Tinkercard and 3-D printed

The Government’s $2Trillion+ gifts swirl about the Inflation Vortex as their purchasing value decays with the happy pork barrels in the background. 

The dollars get smaller as time passes and disappear down the vortex of political self-centeredness, big government spending, and inflation.

artword with 3d printed icons of two trillion dollars going down a spiral vortex

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