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Peace Corps Preparatory Program

peace-corps-logo-vertical.pngThe University of North Georgia, in cooperation with the Peace Corps, has established a Peace Corps Preparatory Program (PCPP) that is open to all students which will help you acquire the knowledge, skills, and experience needed to serve in the Peace Corps.

While completing the requirements of the program does not guarantee admission into the Peace Corps, it does prepare students for service in the organization. 

Images courtesy of the Peace Corps Media Library

Somewhere in the world is a place where you can make a difference in someone else's life. Use your knowledge and expertise to help make lives better and share
in the lives of people in a world apart from your own.
How? Serve in the U.S. Peace Corps.

Application Process

You are encouraged to apply during your sophomore year as there may be prerequisite courses that need to be completed prior to taking the required courses. An early application will help you to better prepare for completing the requirements successfully.

You can plan accordingly using the information below to help fill out your application form and fulfill the requirements of the Peace Corps Preparatory Program. Contact the program coordinator if you have any questions or need assistance.

Program Coordinator

Leander Kellog, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Political Science
706-864-1870
leander.kellogg@ung.edu

Program Structure

The program prepares you for international development fieldwork and potential Peace Corps service by helping you build four core competencies through coursework, hands-on experience, and professional development support.

These four competencies are the following:

pcpp-sectors-675x450.jpgLeveraging concrete knowledge and skills is central to on-the-ground international development work. Through the PCPP you will begin to build a professional specialty, which should serve your career well whether or not you become a Peace Corps Volunteer.

The Peace Corps Volunteers serve within six sectors. PCPP requires at least three courses that align within a sector. The courses can but do not need to come from your academic major or minor. You also must accumulate a minimum of 50 hours of volunteer or work experience in that same sector, preferably in a teaching or outreach capacity.

See the suggested courses for each sector below.

Work Sectors

Education

pcpp-ukraine-675x450.jpgTeach lessons that last a lifetime. Education is the Peace Corp’s largest program area. Volunteers play an important role in creating links among schools, parents, and communities by working in elementary, secondary, and postsecondary schools as math, science, conversational English, and resource teachers or early grade reading and literacy teacher trainers. Volunteers also develop libraries and technology resource centers. 

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

health-675x450.jpgServe on the front lines of global health. Health Volunteers work within their communities to promote important topics such as nutrition, maternal and child health, basic hygiene, and water sanitation. Volunteers also work in HIV/AIDS education and prevention programs to train youth as peer educators, develop appropriate education strategies, provide support to children orphaned by the pandemic, and create programs that provide emotional and financial support to families and communities affected by the disease.

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

  • College of Health Sciences Study Abroad Programs (Dominican Republic, Bolivia, Uganda, Belize)
    • Participate in one of the cultural immersion programs and experience health care systems in Dominican Republic, Bolivia, Uganda, and Belize
  • Clinic Outreach
    • Participate in a clinic outreach program in North Georgia

environment-675x450.jpgHelp forge a global movement to protect our planet. Volunteers lead grassroots efforts in their communities to protect the environment and strengthen understanding of environmental issues. They teach environmental awareness in elementary and secondary schools and to youth groups and community organizations, empowering communities to make their own decisions about how to protect and conserve the local environment. Volunteers also address environmental degradation by promoting sustainable use of natural resources. 

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

  • College of Sciences and Mathematics Study Abroad Programs (Belize, Costa Rica, South Africa, Botswana)
  • Cultural experience and research and field techniques on conservation of landscapes and biodiversity in South Africa and Botswana
  • Field experience in tropical coral reefs and ecosystems in Belize
  • Field experience, local sustainability farming practices, cultural interaction in tropical cloud forest in Costa Rica

agriculture-675x450.jpgLead grassroots efforts to fight hunger in a changing world. Agricultural Volunteers work with small-scale farmers and families to increase food security and production and adapt to climate change while promoting environmental conservation practices. They introduce farmers to techniques that prevent soil erosion, reduce the use of harmful pesticides, and replenish the soil. They work alongside farmers on integrated projects that often combine vegetable gardening, livestock management, agroforestry, and nutrition education.

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

  • Working with a large-scale or family-run business involving vegetable gardening, farming, nursery work, tree planting or care, urban forestry, landscaping, livestock care and management, or fish cultivation and production
  • Teaching or tutoring the public in environmental or agricultural issues/activities
  • Working on the business management or marketing side of a commercial farm
  • Volunteer with the Appalachian Studies Center and the Hometown Harvest Hoop House

youth-in-development-675x450.jpgEmpower the next generation of changemakers. Volunteers work with youth in communities on projects that promote engagement and active citizenship, including gender awareness, employability, health and HIV/AIDS education, environmental awareness, sporting programs, and info technology. 

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

  • Teaching or counseling in at-risk youth programs
  • Activities that involve planning, organizing, assessing community needs, counseling, and leadership, in areas such as education, youth development, health and HIV/AIDS, the environment, and/or business

community-economic-development-675x450.jpgHarness 21st-century tools to help communities lift themselves. Volunteers work with development banks, non governmental organizations, and municipalities to strengthen infrastructure and encourage economic opportunities in communities. They frequently teach in classroom settings and work with entrepreneurs and business owners to develop and market their products. Some Volunteers also teach basic computer skills and help communities take advantage of technologies such as e-commerce, distance learning, and more.

Build 50 hours of related field experience through an activity such as:

  • Working with businesses, organizations, or cooperatives in accounting, finance, microfinance, management, project management, budgeting, or marketing
  • Starting and running your own business or other entrepreneurial activity
  • Training others in computer literacy, maintenance, and repair
  • Website design or online marketing
  • Founding or leading a community- or school-based organization

tiffany_naka_uganda2011.jpgWorking across cultures often entails verbal and nonverbal languages distinct from your own. Building foreign language skills is thus a second key component of the PCPP curriculum.

PCPP minimum language course requirements align with those needed by applicants to the Peace Corps itself, which vary by linguistic region.

Latin America

Spanish-speaking countries typically require two 2000-level intermediate Spanish courses.
SPAN 2001 - Intermediate Spanish I

Continued development and reinforcement of the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency through the situational use of the language and the study of authentic materials from Spanish-speaking regions. Language laboratory and online assignments. Class conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SPAN 1002

Hours:
3



Notes:
Not open to students who have credit in SPAN 2002 or higher or to native speakers

View Course in Catalog

SPAN 2002 - Intermediate Spanish II

Continued development and reinforcement of the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency through the situational use of the language and the study of authentic materials from Spanish-speaking regions. Language laboratory and online assignments. Class conducted in Spanish.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SPAN 2001 or placement by the Department of Spanish

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

West Africa

French-speaking African countries typically require 2000-level intermediate French courses. (or in some cases, any Romance Language)
FREN 2001 - Intermediate French I

Continued development and reinforcement of the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, speaking, reading and writing. Designed to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency through the situational use of the language and the study of authentic materials from French-speaking regions. Language laboratory and online assignments. Class conducted in French.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or placement by the Department of Modern Languages

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

FREN 2002 - Intermediate French II

Continued development and reinforcement of the fundamentals of grammar, vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, listening, speaking, reading and writing. Designed to increase linguistic and cultural proficiency through the situational use of the language and the study of authentic materials from French-speaking regions. Language laboratory and online assignments. Class conducted in French.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: FREN 2001 or placement by the Department of Modern Languages

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

Everywhere Else

The Peace Corps has no explicit language requirements for individuals applying to serve in most other countries. However, you will still likely learn and utilize another language during service, so it is only helpful to have taken at least one foreign language class.

If you are a strong native speaker and hope to serve in a country that speaks your same language, you can skip this requirement.

intercultural-competence-675x450.jpgEngaging thoughtfully and fluidly across cultures begins with one’s own self-awareness. With this learning objective, you will deepen your cultural agility through a mix of three introspective courses in which you learn about others while reflecting upon your own self in relation to others. The goal is for you to build your capacity to shift perspective and behavior around relevant cultural differences.

You must take at least one of these courses.

Required Core Courses

DVRS 1503 - Studies in Diversity Issues

An overview of issues involving diversity and multiculturalism from a variety of perspectives and academic disciplines. The course features specific global issues that are investigated through a cross-national comparative study and which may differ each semester.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ANTH 1102 - Introduction to Anthropology

Anthropology is the holistic study of what it means to be human. Four subfields are surveyed: biological anthropology (the study of human evolution, diversity, and environmental adaptation), archaeology (the study of prehistory, human migrations, emergence of agriculture, and complex societies), linguistic anthropology (comparative studies of human languages and linguistic behavior and animal communication systems), and sociocultural anthropology (the study of cultures in both complex and small-scale societies; human cognition and behavior in cross-cultural contexts).

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

COMM 1503 - Intercultural Communication

This course introduces the student to the study of communication, culture, and communication between cultures in our global society. Students will become aware of the ability of culture to shape and modify personal views or reality through differing perceptions of world view, family experiences, history, and verbal/nonverbal message systems. How diverse cultures communicate in business, educational, health settings and conflict resolution will be addressed.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 0989

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ENGL 2140 - Gender and Literature

This course is a historical survey of literary texts with a focus on gender and its relationships to economics, religion, politics, art and culture. This survey involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1102H with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ENGL 2111 - World Literature I

This course is a study of world literature from the beginnings through the seventeenth century, which involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1102H with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ENGL 2112 - World Literature II

This course is a study of world literature from the eighteenth century to the present, which involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL 1102H with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ENST 2030 - Environmental Studies & Sustainability

A seminar course that addresses the social, political, and cultural aspects of human ecological problems. As an introduction to the field of Environmental Studies, it examines both past and current human activities and their influence on our species and the physical environment, and it explores the place of cultural elements in creating and solving environmental problems.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

GEOG 1102 - World Regional Geography

An introduction to the major themes of contemporary world regional geography focusing on a geographic examination of the cultures, politics and histories of the major human regions of the world. The course will examine the ways in which environment, culture, politics, history, and economics interact to create unique geographical regions. It will introduce the major issues addressed in the process of globalization in the context of history, geography, political economy, environment, culture and weigh the pros and cons of this important process. This course may be used to fulfill the elective requirements of Core Area B or Core Area E.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 1111 - World History I

A survey of World History to early modern times.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 1112 - World History II

A survey of World History from early modern times to the present.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

PHIL 2200 - Ethics from a Global Perspective

This course introduces the student to the major, traditional ethical theories, their foundational arguments, strengths, weaknesses, and meaning for life as lived. The course explores both the major Western and Non-western ethical theories.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

POLS 1153 - Global Citizenship

This course will introduce students to regions of the world, global institutions, international politics, and engage students in current debates of global significance. Politics will be emphasized as an important factor influencing the issues studied and as being a part of solutions. Students will be encouraged to place themselves within a global community, and to realize their actions have global impact and to think critically about global issues from multiple perspectives.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 0989 (when required)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

POLS 2401 - Global Issues

An analysis of the basic forces which govern the behavior of nations in their relations with one another. This study of world power conflicts, diplomacy and international cooperation is designed to acquaint the student with the basic issues and areas of conflict among the nation-states of the contemporary world.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 0989 (when required)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 2860 - History of World Religions

This course will examine the historical development of the major religions of the world and their contributions to world civilization. HIST 2860 is cross-listed with RELG 2860.

Hours:
3



Cross-listed
RELG 2860 View Course in Catalog

RELG 2860 - History of World Religions

This course will examine the historical development of the major religions of the world, and their contributions to world civilization. Cross-listed with HIST 2860.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

SOCI 1160 - Introduction to Social Problems

This course is a theoretical and empirical analysis of selected current social problems, their social and cultural causes, consequences, and various proposed solutions. It also examines the interconnectedness of local, national, and global problems.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 0989 (when required)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

You can choose two more from the Core Courses above or two other courses from the electives list to complete your intercultural competence requirement.

Elective Courses

ENGL 3350 - Postcolonial World Literature

The course will study the question of identity-both personal and national-in postcolonial works around the globe. Postcolonial literature occurs at different times for different countries (and cultures), but the majority of the literature will be in the modern era. After a brief overview of the colonial mindset, including such concepts as mimicry and the Other, the course will offer students an understanding of how countries, cultures, and individuals approach the formation of an identity that is both separate from and linked to the former colonizer.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisites: ENGL 2050, ENGL 2230 and one ENGL 2100-level literature course, all with a grade of B or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

POLS 4210 - Politics of Development

This course explores the political, economic, and social challenges of Third World development. It covers a wide range of contemporary issues affecting developing countries, and focuses especially on policies aimed at reducing poverty and underdevelopment. In a world where 840 million people are malnourished, where nearly 1.3 billion people live on less than a dollar per day, and where dozens of countries constitute 'failed states,' the development challenges faced by the Third World are unquestionably one of the most important concerns of our time.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101H, and POLS 2401 or POLS 2401H (POLS 2401 can be taken as a Corequisite as well)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

POLS 4160 - Gender & Politics

The study of gender and politics explores concepts of power found in governance. The course will examine how political power, institutions and actions can be gendered by using critical and analytical gender theories. Gender theories will be applied to an examination of gender equality in society, economics, and politics.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101H

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

EDUC 2120 - Exploring Sociocultural Perspectives on Diversity

This course is designed for students to examine (a) the nature and function of culture; (b) the development of individual identities and group cultural identity; (c) systems of privilege, power, and oppression; (d) definitions and implications of diversity; (e) the influences of sociocultural factors on learning, development, and pedagogy; and (f) the foundations and applications of social justice education. A minimum of 20 hours of field experience in a setting chosen by the instructor is required.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisites: EDUC 2110 and ENGL 1101 with grades of C or higher (an overall GPA of 2.5 is recommended)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HSDA 3110 - Diversity and Social Justice

Introduces students to the historical context of diversity and social justice and their relationship to human services delivery systems, with a focus on oppression and privilege as manifested in societal systems and forces that influence their development and continuation. Diversity and Social Justice introduces the human services student to the wide range of individuals who may be recipients of services and care in agency settings. We will acknowledge and explore the statuses and conditions that promote or limit human functioning. The course will cover topics including socioeconomic class, racial and ethnic inequality, sex, gender, sexual orientation, religious differences, physical and mental disabilities, chemical dependencies, aging, and delinquency/crime.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SOCI 1160 with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

MDST 4200 - Diversity in the Media

Discussion and examination of diversity issues and representations of social groups by news and entertainment media. Areas covered will include gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, age, and people with disabilities. Social, cultural, economic, psychological, and other effects of the representations of these groups will be considered. Media examined will include news media as well as movies, video games, television, magazines, and web sites. Ethical problems for media producers in portraying social groups will be considered.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: COMM 2900, COMM 2050, or permission of instructor

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 3101 - History of Social Reform in the United States, 1880-2000

In this course, we will examine selected major trends, concepts, and facts in the history of social reform in the United States from the Progressive Era to the present. Upon completion of this class, students will be able to: 1) describe and explain the evolution of social reform policies from the Progressive Era to the present; 2) describe the chronology of major reform period in the 20th century American history to the present; 3) describe and analyze the influence of various factors on social reform policies, including race, gender, ethnicity, and class; 4) describe and analyze the interaction between social movements and federal, state, and local government reform policies; 5) demonstrate effective writing, analytical thinking, and oral communication skills based on material from class assignments.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: HIST 2111 or HIST 2112

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

SOCI 2100 - Constructions of Difference

In this course, we critically examine the social construction of difference, focusing on race, class, gender and sexuality. These constructions are pivotal and interesting concepts in the analysis of social and economic inequality, laying a foundation for further investigation and insight in advanced sociology courses. The course spotlights the involvement of social institutions in the construction process and how the consequences create systems of inequality that privilege few while oppressing many.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101 and ENGL 0989 (when required)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

SOCI 3050 - Race and Ethnicity

This course examines racial, ethnic and cultural groups in the United States from a sociological perspective. Particular attention will be paid to the political, economic, social, historic and cultural development of race as an idea; racialized opportunity in social institutions; and the historical and economic functions of racism and discrimination, as well as their implications for a pluralistic society.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

GNST 2140 - Introduction to Gender Studies

This course provides a study of the concepts of womanhood and manhood as they are revealed in literature. Through analysis of assigned texts, the class will examine gender and its relationship to economics, religion, politics, art, culture, and other areas.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 2140 - Gender and Sexuality in History

This course will provide students with a background in how gender and sexuality is constructed historically around the world. The course will explore the theories of gender and sexuality as well as the concrete construction of these identities.

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 4310 - Gender & Sexuality of Latin America

This course explores gender including masculinity, femininity and third genders; how issues of gender and sexuality are shaped by history and shape Latin American history. (LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY)

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

HIST 4418 - Gender & Sexuality in the Middle East

This course examines the relationship between genders as well as the construction of gender and sexuality in the Middle East and about the Middle East. We discuss the different forms of sexuality, the meaning of sexuality, the roles of men and women, and the construction of masculinity and femininity in this class. (MIDDLE EAST, WORLD).

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

POLS 4160 - Gender & Politics

The study of gender and politics explores concepts of power found in governance. The course will examine how political power, institutions and actions can be gendered by using critical and analytical gender theories. Gender theories will be applied to an examination of gender equality in society, economics, and politics.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: POLS 1101 or POLS 1101H

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

PSYC 3520 - Human Sexuality

This course focuses on biological, psychological, and social aspects of human sexual functioning.  Emphasis is given to empirical findings and their personal, interpersonal, and social implications.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: PSYC 1101 or PSYC 1101H with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

SOCI 3520 - The Social Construction of Sexuality

A sociological investigation of the social, cultural, and historical construction of sexual knowledge, identity, behavior, and desire.

Hours:
3



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SOCI 3800 - Sociology of Gender

This course considers issues of gender from a sociological perspective. Gender plays an important part of our lives as individuals, but also structures life within U.S. society. We will focus on gender socialization, practices, and inequalities in the contemporary United States. Specifically, we will examine the influence of gender in interpersonal relationships, at work, in education, in families, and in other areas of social life. Although this course is primarily about gender, we will examine how masculinities and femininities are shaped by other social factors such as race, class and sexual orientation.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: SOCI 1101

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

COMM 3050 - Advanced Intercultural Communication

Exploring the foundations, processes, and applications of communicating in intercultural contexts, this course emphasizes intercultural theory and research on intercultural power and contexts, identity, language, and nonverbal codes, understanding intercultural transactions, impacts of popular culture, and managing intercultural conflict.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: COMM 1100 or permission of the instructor

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

ENGL 2160 - Multicultural American Literature

This course is a survey of American literature by writers with distinct national, social, or ethnic identities. This survey involves reading, analyzing, and interpreting significant literary works within their historical, social, and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite/Corequisite:
Prerequisite: ENGL 1102 or ENGL1102H with a grade of C or higher

Hours:
3



View Course in Catalog

NURS 3580 - Transcultural Communication in Nursing

A course designed to help students acquire the skills necessary to communicate effectively in today's multicultural society. Classroom activities will focus on improving the student's ability to recognize and overcome cultural biases, learning about different styles of communication and developing transcultural communication skills and interacting with others in an ethical, caring manner.

Hours:
2



View Course in Catalog

Contact the PCPP coordinator, Dr. Leander Kellogg, if you would like to discuss selecting another course in the catalog that may be suitable.

leadership-675x450.jpg

Peace Corps service and similar international development work opportunities are highly professional and selective. PCPP requires three specific activities that will strengthen your candidacy for the Peace Corps (or any other professional endeavor):

  1. Have your resume critiqued by someone in Career Services.
  2. Attend a workshop or class on interview skills at Career Services.
  3. Develop at least one significant leadership experience and be prepared to discuss it thoughtfully. For example, organizing a campus event, leading a work or volunteer project, or serving on the executive board of a student organization.
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