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Research-Based Teaching Series (RBTS)

Co-sponsored by the Department of English and the Center for Teaching, Learning, and Leadership, RBTS seeks to support the work of faculty from all disciplines, colleges, and campuses by offering faculty presentations and workshops on best practices in teaching and learning. These workshops not only provide information and resources for faculty seeking to enhance their own pedagogical practices, but also give faculty an opportunity to present their work to peers.

2018-2019
RBTS Topics and Calendar

Date/Time

Facilitator

Topic

Location

Monday, December 3, 2018

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Donna Gessell

Heightened Critical Thinking: Requiring a Prospectus and Annotated Bibliography in the Research Paper Process

The workshop details the prospectus and annotated bibliography assignment, which has long proven a best practice for guiding students to engage in their own learning during the research paper process. Goals for workshop participants are twofold: to understand how the assignment is valuable to enhance student learning and to try it out in their own disciplines. Participants will be provided with copies of the assignment. Then we will relate it to each of the criteria in the AAC&U Critical Thinking VALUE rubric, pairing each of the five criteria in the rubric with a question in the prospectus assignment. During the discussion we will link to the stages in the writing process, detailing how every stage of the process—including brainstorming, research, and planning, which are included in this assignment—can be taught, but that the writing stage cannot be taught, making the assignment an even more valuable tool for promoting engaged student learning. To shape the revision stage, we will discuss how the prospectus can be rearranged; and we will discuss why the editing stage should be postponed. To complete the discussion of the writing process, we will explore the rhetorical principles of audience, purpose, and occasion and how they affect the publishing stage, but must be considered early on. I will share feedback about the assignment from my students, who are at various levels of writing. In addition to discussion and question and answer, audience involvement will include brainstorming how the assignment can be used in different disciplines with and without adaption. Finally, all participants will have the opportunity to try out the prospectus assignment to start engaging in their own academic project or one that they are considering for their students. Association of American Colleges and Universities. (2009). Critical Thinking VALUE Rubric. Retrieved from: https://www.aacu.org/value/rubrics/critical-thinking

*Blue ridge rooms are not available.

Cumming 246

Dahlonega Hansford 312

Gainesville Dunlap-Mathis 5105

Oconee SRC 581

 

Wednesday, February 6, 2019

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m

Lisa Diehl

Teaching Social Justice in the Writing Composition Classroom: Rising Up!

This session will address one of the major goals of a liberal arts education: to enhance the individual’s capacity for critically assessing the quality of one’s own thinking and how it may impact others. I will introduce and explain how I integrated social justice into an English writing class. This approach to composition empowers students to gain a more comprehensive understanding of poverty, privilege, race, and social status through the perspective of others and allows them to examine their own thinking as well. This lesson plan is designed to build comprehension skills through engagement with multiple forms of media, as well as develop and strengthen critical thinking skills that promote analysis and reflection to improve communication skills and enhance leadership characteristics needed to successfully engage with a global society. I asked students to write reflections about specific social justice issues based on readings and class discussions. Students also completed in-class activities, which helped them become more aware of social justice issues which affect them and other Americans. Students demonstrated awareness and verification that justice issues are relevant, important and are not easily resolved. They also noted their own self-awareness of prejudices and stereotypes, which they had never considered. A liberal arts education at university must include learning that empowers students and prepares them to deal with complexity, diversity, and change. It provides students with broad knowledge of the wider world as well as in-depth study in a specific area of interest. A liberal arts education helps students develop a sense of social responsibility, as well as strong and transferable intellectual and practical skills such as communication, analytical and problem-solving skills, and a demonstrated ability to apply knowledge and skills in real-world settings.

Blue Ridge 107

Cumming 262

Dahlonega Hansford 312

Gainesville Nesbitt 5105

Oconee SRC 564

Wednesday, March 6, 2019

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m

Minsu Kim

What Happens When Students Read and Write Mathematics?

Students often struggle to express their thinking processes, especially in courses focused on quantitative content. You’ll learn in this session how help students to be active learners and develop their quantitative skills through math writing.

Blue Ridge 107

Cumming 262

Dahlonega Hansford 312

Gainesville Nesbitt 5105

Oconee SRC 564

Call for Proposals

RBTS invites proposals for the 2018-19 academic year. As a partnering institution for the AAC&U’s Liberal Education and America’s Promise (LEAP), we encourage submissions that support the principles of this initiative.

Presentations/workshops should be 45 minutes long, allow time for Q&A, and include some discussion of pedagogical principles and their applicability to disciplines outside the presenter’s field, information about the practical applications of these principles in your own classroom work/research, and 3-5 scholarly sources that participants can consult for further research. Although these workshops are teleconferenced across all campuses, we encourage presenters to include some interactivity with attendees.

Please note: This is for informational purposes only. The deadline (July 31, 2018) for submissions has passed.

Registration

Please register for each individual session.
(UNG login required)

Questions?

Email any questions about RBTS to Mary Carney at mary.carney@ung.edu.

Past Events
2017-2018
Date and Time Topic Location

Monday, September 11, 2017
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Smoothing the Transition: Helping Your Freshmen Adjust to College Work
Led by Steve Pearson, Assistant Professor of English

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Digital Natives Lost in the Forest of Google
Led by Austina Jordan, Associate Professor of Library Science/Collection Management Librarian

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

Wednesday, February 21, 2018
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Cooperative Discussions for Critical Thinking
Led by Danielle Hartsfield, Assistant Professor of Literacy and Elementary Education

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
Wednesday, March 7, 2018
12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

Best Practices for Significant Learning in the Flipped Classroom
Led by Sarah Formica, Associate Professor of Physics

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 246
Dahlonega Campus | Dunlap Hall 211B
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 3211
Oconee Campus | 318

Wednesday, October 3, 2018

12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Effectively Engaging Undergraduates in the Analysis of Primary Literature

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | Hansford 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
2016-2017
Date and Time Topic Location
Wednesday, September 7, 2016
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Literature is an Ally: Reading War in the Classroom and Community

Kristin Kelly, Associate Professor of English, discusses “Talking Service," a national reading and discussion program for servicemen and servicewomen coming back to civilian life from the warzone. Kelly's talk will help faculty will deepen their understanding of the veteran student experience and garner resources to create effective learning environments for veterans.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
Wednesday, October 5, 2016
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Statistics: It's Not Just for STEM Anymore!

This statistics workshop, presented by Gina Reed, Professor of Mathematics, is designed to support the research of all faculty and will provide important methods and tools for conducting quantitative research in the classroom.

Gainesville Campus | Watkins Building 182
Wednesday, January 18, 2017
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Everyone Can Teach Writing: Three Constructs to Engage Students in Deep Learning

Jim Shimkus and Anita Turlington will explain the three constructs as high-impact teaching practices that enhance student learning and development. These practices are helpful not only for those teachers whose specialty is writing instruction, but also teachers in any discipline who are interested in strategies that enhance student learning and engagement.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 581

Wednesday, February 1, 2017
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Effectively Responding to Student Writing

Matthew Boedy, Molly Daniel, Jim Shimkus will teach on how to be a more effective and efficient giver of feedback to your students on their writing. This workshop will look at research-based practices in composition studies to aid feedback. Professors will receive a great handy worksheet and information on how the Writing Center can assist this process.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
Monday, March 27, 2017
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

Is Blended Learning a Viable Option?

Presented by Jennifer Schneider, Professor of Accounting. Motivating students to engage in the course material earlier, having accessibility to videos and other online resources, requiring completion of pre-requisite assignments, and holding students accountable for their own learning are various methods to reverse the traditional learning process. This workshop will discuss whether blended learning is a viable option in modern classrooms.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564
Monday, April 24, 2017
12 p.m. - 1 p.m.

FYC as Part of First-Year Experience

J. Stephen Pearson, Professor of English, will present retention issues that can be addressed in the First Year Dr. Composition (FYC) classroom and will ask faculty to brainstorm solutions. Obstacles with research, not understanding expectations, retention problems, and students’ backgrounds are all obstacles that students face. Because all of these issues can be addressed, and hopefully prevented, by faculty, this presentation will ask participants to consider ways to deal with them within the FYC curriculum.

Blue Ridge Campus | Room 107
Cumming Campus | Room 262
Dahlonega Campus | |Hansford Hall 312
Gainesville Campus | Nesbitt 5105
Oconee Campus | SRC 564

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